High fructose corn syrup and diabetes prevalence: A global perspective

@article{Goran2013HighFC,
  title={High fructose corn syrup and diabetes prevalence: A global perspective},
  author={M. Goran and S. Ulijaszek and E. Ventura},
  journal={Global Public Health},
  year={2013},
  volume={8},
  pages={55 - 64}
}
Abstract The overall aim of this study was to evaluate, from a global and ecological perspective, the relationships between availability of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Using published resources, country-level estimates (n =43 countries) were obtained for: total sugar, HFCS and total calorie availability, obesity, two separate prevalence estimates for diabetes, prevalence estimate for impaired glucose tolerance and fasting plasma glucose. Pearson's… Expand
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TLDR
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