High-flow nasal cannula therapy for children with bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis

@article{Lin2019HighflowNC,
  title={High-flow nasal cannula therapy for children with bronchiolitis: a systematic review and meta-analysis},
  author={Jilei Lin and Yin Zhang and Limei Xiong and Sha Liu and Cai-hui Gong and Jihong Dai},
  journal={Archives of Disease in Childhood},
  year={2019},
  volume={104},
  pages={564 - 576}
}
Objectives To review the effects and safety of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) for bronchiolitis. Methods Six electronic databases including PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, CQ VIP Database and Wanfang Data were searched from their inception to 1 June 2018. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which investigated the effects of HFNC versus other forms of oxygen therapies for bronchiolitis were included. Results Nine RCTs with… Expand
The Effects and Safety of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Children with Bronchiolitis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.
TLDR
CPAP for the initial respiratory management significantly benefit children with bronchiolitis, the delivery of CPAP by helmet may be a better choice, and more high-quality research is needed to confirm the conclusion. Expand
Efficacy and safety of high flow nasal oxygen for children with bronchiolitis: systematic review and meta-analysis
TLDR
HFNC is superior to SOT in terms of treatment failure and there is no significant difference between HFNC and CPAP in termsof treatment failure, which suggest HFNC is safe to use in acute hospital settings. Expand
High‐flow oxygen in bronchiolitis
  • Medicine
  • Journal of paediatrics and child health
  • 2019
TLDR
High-flow nasal cannula oxygen is less invasive than CPAP and can be a useful intervention for babies who need more than standard oxygen treatment but do not yet need CPAP or more invasive ventilation. Expand
Impact of initial flow rate of high-flow nasal cannula on clinical outcomes in infants with bronchiolitis.
TLDR
The commencing flow rates of initial HFNC therapy impact individual patient's outcomes, including length of stay and rates of treatment failure, includingLength of stay from starting of weaning HFNC to time of discharge. Expand
Continuous Positive Airway Pressure vs. High Flow Nasal Cannula in children with acute severe or moderate bronchiolitis. A systematic review and Meta-analysis.
TLDR
In moderate/severe bronchiolitis CPAP demonstrated a lower risk of therapeutic failure and a longer time to failure, but more adverse events like nasal injury. Expand
High-Flow Nasal Cannula versus Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Critical Bronchiolitis: A Randomized Controlled Pilot.
TLDR
In this pilot study, treatment with HFNC resulted in a rate of treatment failure similar to CPAP, and Pediatric intensive care unit length of stay was similar between the CPAP and HFNC groups. Expand
Outcomes of High-Flow Nasal Cannula Vs. Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Young Children With Respiratory Distress: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
  • Xueqin Zhao, Qiaozhi Qin, Xian Zhang
  • Frontiers in Pediatrics
  • 2021
Background: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been associated with a lower risk of treatment failure than high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in pediatric patients with respiratory distressExpand
Clinical factors associated with intubation in the high flow nasal cannula era.
TLDR
Factors associated with respiratory failure in children with bronchiolitis on high flow nasal cannula can be considered upon presentation to selectively identify children at higher risk for respiratory failure. Expand
High-flow nasal cannula oxygen therapy in children: a clinical review
  • J. Kwon
  • Medicine
  • Clinical and experimental pediatrics
  • 2020
TLDR
The development of clinical guidelines for HFNC, including flow settings, indications, and contraindications, device management, efficacy identification, and safety issues are needed, particularly in children. Expand
Widespread Adoption of Low-Value Therapy: The Case of Bronchiolitis and High-Flow Oxygen
* Abbreviations: CPG — : clinical practice guideline HFNC — : high-flow nasal cannula Bronchiolitis is one of the most common reasons for pediatric hospitalization in the United States, incurringExpand
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Objective To demonstrate that heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) is superior to inhaled hypertonic saline solution (HSS) in improving respiratory distress in moderate bronchiolitis.Expand
High flow therapy versus hypertonic saline in bronchiolitis: randomised controlled trial
Objective To demonstrate that heated humidified high-flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC) is superior to inhaled hypertonic saline solution (HSS) in improving respiratory distress in moderate bronchiolitis.Expand
Clinical application of heated, humidified high-flow nasal cannula in the treatment of moderate and severe bronchiolitis in infants
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The efficacy and security of HHFNC on moderate and severe bronchiolitis are better than those of nCPAP, and it is recommended for clinical application widely. Expand
High-flow nasal cannula therapy for infants with bronchiolitis.
TLDR
The current evidence is of low quality, from one small study with uncertainty about the estimates of effect and an unclear risk of performance and detection bias, and the included study provides some indication that HFNC therapy is feasible and well tolerated. Expand
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TLDR
Among infants with bronchiolitis who were treated outside an ICU, those who received high‐flow oxygen therapy had significantly lower rates of escalation of care due to treatment failure than those in the group that received standard oxygen therapy. Expand
Reduced intubation rates for infants after introduction of high-flow nasal prong oxygen delivery
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HFNP therapy has dramatically changed ventilatory practice in infants <24 months of age in this institution, and appears to reduce the need for intubation in infants with viral bronchiolitis. Expand
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CPAP was more effective than HFNC in decreasing respiratory rate (RR) and FiO2 and no differences were observed in length of treatment or complications. Expand
Nasopharyngeal Airway Pressures in Bronchiolitis Patients Treated With High-Flow Nasal Cannula Oxygen Therapy
TLDR
Increasing flow rates of HHHFNC therapy are associated with linear increases in NP pressures in bronchiolitis patients, and only flow (not weight or gender) had an effect on generated pressure. Expand
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TLDR
In young infants with moderate to severe AVB, initial management with HFNC did not have a failure rate similar to that of nCPAP, and the success rate with the alternative respiratory support, intubation rate, durations of noninvasive and invasive ventilation, skin lesions, and length of PICU stay were comparable between groups. Expand
Improved clinical and economic outcomes in severe bronchiolitis with pre-emptive nCPAP ventilatory strategy
PurposeSevere bronchiolitis is the leading cause of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) has become the primary respiratoryExpand
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