High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in a cohort of breastfeeding mothers and their infants: a 6-month follow-up pilot study.

@article{Wagner2006HighdoseVD,
  title={High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in a cohort of breastfeeding mothers and their infants: a 6-month follow-up pilot study.},
  author={Carol L. Wagner and Thomas C. Hulsey and Deanna Fanning and Myla D. Ebeling and Bruce W Hollis},
  journal={Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine},
  year={2006},
  volume={1 2},
  pages={
          59-70
        }
}
  • C. Wagner, T. Hulsey, B. Hollis
  • Published 10 July 2006
  • Medicine
  • Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine
OBJECTIVE To examine the effect of high-dose maternal vitamin D(3) (vitD) supplementation on the nutritional vitD status of breastfeeding (BF) women and their infants compared with maternal and infant controls receiving 400 and 300 IU vitD/day, respectively. DESIGN Fully lactating women (n = 19) were enrolled at 1-month postpartum into a randomized- control pilot trial. Each mother received one of two treatments for a 6-month study period: 0 or 6000 IU vitD(3) plus a prenatal vitamin… 

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TLDR
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TLDR
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Impact of Vitamin D Supplementation during Lactation on Vitamin D Status and Body Composition of Mother-Infant Pairs: A MAVID Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
Vitamin D supplementation at a dose of 400 IU/d was not sufficient to maintain 25(OH)D >20 ng/ml in nursing women, while 1200IU/d appeared more effective, but had no effect on breastfed offspring vitamin D status, or changes in the bone mass and the body composition observed in both during breastfeeding.
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