High Levels of Y-Chromosome Differentiation among Native Siberian Populations and the Genetic Signature of a Boreal Hunter-Gatherer Way of Life

@article{Karafet2002HighLO,
  title={High Levels of Y-Chromosome Differentiation among Native Siberian Populations and the Genetic Signature of a Boreal Hunter-Gatherer Way of Life},
  author={Tatiana Karafet and T. S. Osipova and Tatiana M Ludmila P Marina A Olga L Stephen L Michael F Gubina and Tatiana M Ludmila P Marina A Olga L Stephen L Michael F Posukh and Tatiana M Ludmila P Marina A Olga L Stephen L Michael F Zegura and Tatiana M J. S Alan J Joseph C S. P. K W. A Laura Michael Hammer},
  journal={Human Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={74},
  pages={761 - 789}
}
We examined genetic variation on the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome (NRY) to investigate the paternal population structure of indigenous Siberian groups and to reconstruct the historical events leading to the peopling of Siberia. [...] Key Method A set of 62 biallelic markers on the NRY were genotyped in 1432 males representing 18 Siberian populations, as well as nine populations from Central and East Asia and one from European Russia.Expand

Figures, Tables, and Topics from this paper

Autosomal and uniparental portraits of the native populations of Sakha (Yakutia): implications for the peopling of Northeast Eurasia
TLDR
The high-resolution phylogenetic dissection of mtDNA and Y-chromosome haplogroups as well as analysis of autosomal SNP data suggests that Sakha was colonized by repeated expansions from South Siberia with minor gene flow from the Lower Amur/Southern Okhotsk region and/or Kamchatka. Expand
Y-Chromosome Variation in Altaian Kazakhs Reveals a Common Paternal Gene Pool for Kazakhs and the Influence of Mongolian Expansions
TLDR
The shared paternal ancestry of Kazakhs differentiates them from other Central Asian populations, and all of them showed evidence of genetic influence by the 13th century CE Mongol Empire. Expand
The diversity of Y-chromosome lineages in indigenous population of South Siberia
TLDR
The paternal lineages of the gene pools of South Siberian ethnic groups were characterized using the variation analysis of 17 Y chromosome diallelic loci, and the Y chromosome polymorphism has been analyzed in a wide spectrum of Asian populations. Expand
Phylogeography of the Y‐chromosome haplogroup C in northern Eurasia
To reconstruct the phylogenetic structure of Y‐chromosome haplogroup (hg) C in populations of northern Eurasia, we have analyzed the diversity of microsatellite (STR) loci in a total sample of 413Expand
Contrasting patterns of Y-chromosome variation in South Siberian populations from Baikal and Altai-Sayan regions
TLDR
The population of the Baikal region demonstrates the prevalence of Central/Eastern Asian lineages, whereas in the populations of Altai and Sayan regions the highest paternal contribution resulted from Eastern European descent is revealed. Expand
Analysis of Y-chromosome variability and its comparison with mtDNA variability reveals different demographic histories between islands in the Azores Archipelago (Portugal).
TLDR
An assessment of the NRY variability, and its comparison with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variability, was further evidence of the differential composition of males during the settlement of the three groups of islands, contrary to what has been previously deduced for the female settlers using mtDNA data. Expand
Separating the post-Glacial coancestry of European and Asian Y chromosomes within haplogroup R1a
TLDR
The diversity and frequency profiles of M458 suggest its origin during the early Holocene and a subsequent expansion likely related to a number of prehistoric cultural developments in the region, and the virtual absence of M 458 chromosomes outside Europe speaks against substantial patrilineal gene flow from East Europe to Asia, including to India, at least since the mid-Holocene. Expand
Y-Chromosome Marker Characterization of Epipaleolithic and Neolithic Groups of Southern India
TLDR
The phylogenetic analysis of the two populations revealed six Y-chromosome haplogroups: C, F*, H, K*, L*, and R2, which was predominantly of native origin clustering with other Dravidian tribes of the region. Expand
Analysis of Y‐chromosome Variability and its Comparison with mtDNA Variability Reveals Different Demographic Histories Between Islands in the Azores Archipelago (Portugal)
TLDR
An assessment of the NRY variability, and its comparison with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variability, was further evidence of the differential composition of males during the settlement of the three groups of islands, contrary to what has been previously deduced for the female settlers using mtDNA data. Expand
Y Chromosome Haplogroup Distribution in Indo-European Speaking Tribes of Gujarat, Western India
TLDR
Investigation and reconstructing paternal population structure and population histories in Indo-European speaking tribal population groups of Southern Gujarat, India revealed that the Indo- European speaking populations along with the Dravidian speaking groups of southern India have an influence on the tribal groups of Gujarat. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 87 REFERENCES
[Microsatellite haplotypes of the Y-chromosome demonstrate the absence of subdivisions and presence of several components in the Tuvinian male gene pool].
TLDR
Estimates of the age of the Y-chromosome lines showed that the male gene pool of modern Tuvinians originated in the late Paleolithic or Neolithic period and line B was assumed to originate from the ancient Caucasoid population of the Tuva region. Expand
A back migration from Asia to sub-Saharan Africa is supported by high-resolution analysis of human Y-chromosome haplotypes.
TLDR
Phylogeographic analyses suggest that a large component of the present Khoisan gene pool is eastern African in origin and that Asia was the source of a back migration to sub-Saharan Africa. Expand
Mitochondrial DNA variation in two South Siberian Aboriginal populations: implications for the genetic history of North Asia.
TLDR
The results of nucleotide diversity analysis in East Asian and Siberian populations suggest that Central and East Asia were the source areas from which the genetically heterogeneous Tuvinians and Buryats first emerged. Expand
Mitochondrial DNA variation in Koryaks and Itel'men: population replacement in the Okhotsk Sea-Bering Sea region during the Neolithic.
TLDR
Results were consistent with colonization events associated with the relatively recent immigration to Kamchatka of new tribes from the Siberian mainland region, although remnants of ancient Beringian populations were still evident in the Koryak and Itel'men gene pools. Expand
The dual origin and Siberian affinities of Native American Y chromosomes.
TLDR
Data suggest that Native American male lineages were derived from two major Siberian migrations, which contributed to the modern genetic pool of the Na-Dene and Amerinds of North and Central America. Expand
Y chromosome polymorphisms in Native American and Siberian populations: identification of Native American Y chromosome haplotypes
TLDR
The detection of the T allele in all five Native American populations studied and in two of nine native Siberian populations suggested that the DYS199 T allele may have originated in Beringia and was then spread throughout the New World by the founding populations of the major subgroups of modern Native Americans. Expand
Y chromosome markers and Trans-Bering Strait dispersals.
TLDR
Data do not support the Greenberg et al. (1986) tripartite model for the early peopling of the Americas and the perplexing presence of the 1T haplotype in northeastern Siberia may be due to back-migration from the New World to Asia. Expand
mtDNA diversity in Chukchi and Siberian Eskimos: implications for the genetic history of Ancient Beringia and the peopling of the New World.
TLDR
The sequence-divergence estimates for haplogroups A, C, and D of Siberian and Native American populations indicate that the earliest inhabitants of Beringia possessed a limited number of founding mtDNA haplotypes and that the first humans expanded into the New World approximately 34,000 years before present. Expand
Hierarchical patterns of global human Y-chromosome diversity.
TLDR
A nested cladistic analysis (NCA) demonstrated that both population structure processes (recurrent gene flow restricted by isolation by distance and long-distance dispersals) and population history events were instrumental in explaining this tripartite division of global NRY diversity. Expand
Out of Africa and back again: nested cladistic analysis of human Y chromosome variation.
TLDR
It is inferred that one of the oldest events in the nested cladistic analysis was a range expansion out of Africa which resulted in the complete replacement of Y chromosomes throughout the Old World, a finding consistent with many versions of the Out of Africa Replacement Model. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...