High‐level β‐carotene production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without overexpression of a truncated HMG1 (tHMG1)

@article{Sun2020HighlevelP,
  title={High‐level $\beta$‐carotene production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae without overexpression of a truncated HMG1 (tHMG1)},
  author={Liang Sun and Christine A Atkinson and Ye-Gi Lee and Yong‐Su Jin},
  journal={Biotechnology and Bioengineering},
  year={2020},
  volume={117},
  pages={3522 - 3532}
}
β‐Carotene is a natural pigment and health‐promoting metabolite, and has been widely used in the nutraceutical, feed, and cosmetic industries. Here, we engineered a GRAS yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to produce β‐carotene from xylose, the second most abundant and inedible sugar component of lignocellulose biomass. Specifically, a β‐carotene biosynthetic pathway containing crtYB, crtI, and crtE from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was introduced into a xylose‐fermenting S. cerevisiae. The… 
Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of β-carotene from hydrophobic substrates
TLDR
The engineered baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is engineered by expression of lipases and carotenogenic genes to enable the production of β-carotene on hydrophobic substrates to demonstrate the potential of applying lipase and hydrophilic substrate supplementation for theproduction of carotanoids in S. Cerevisiae.
L‐malic acid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae
TLDR
Successful engineering of S. cerevisiae for the production of malic acid from xylose is confirmed, confirming that that xylOSE offers the efficient production of various biofuels and chemicals by engineered S. Cerevisiae.
Xylose Assimilation for the Efficient Production of Biofuels and Chemicals by Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae
TLDR
Recent advances in metabolic engineering of yeast are summarized to address bottlenecks on xylose assimilation and to enable simultaneous co‐utilization of xylOSE and other substrates in lignocellulosic hydrolysates.
Complete and efficient conversion of plant cell wall hemicellulose into high-value bioproducts by engineered yeast
TLDR
It is demonstrated that acetate can be rapidly co-consumed with xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which leads to a metabolic re-configuration that boosts the synthesis of acetyl-CoA derived bioproducts, including triacetic acid lactone (TAL) and vitamin A, in engineered strains.
Enhancing Squalene Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Metabolic Engineering and Random Mutagenesis
TLDR
To improve squalene production by metabolic engineering and random mutagenesis, the mevalonate (MVA) pathway was enhanced, by integrating tHMG1 and IDI1 into multi-copy site Ty2 and a high throughput screening strategy based on Nile red staining was established for highSqualene-producer screening.
Selective production of retinol by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the expression of retinol dehydrogenase
TLDR
Selective production of retinol efficiently from xylose is achieved by introducing human RDH12 and NADH oxidase into S. cerevisiae by introducing heterologous ret inol dehydrogenase into retinoids mixture‐producing Saccharomyces cerevisae for the selective production ofretinol usingxylose.
Metabolic engineering of Yarrowia lipolytica for terpenoids production: advances and perspectives
TLDR
This review highlights progress in the engineering of Y. lipolytica as terpenoids biomanufacturing factories, describing the different terpenoid biosynthetic pathways and summarizing various metabolic engineering strategies, including progress in genetic manipulation, dynamic regulation, organelle engineering, and terpene synthase variants.
Biotechnological advances for improving natural pigment production: a state-of-the-art review
TLDR
In this review, the innovative methods and strategies for optimization and engineering of both native and heterologous producers of natural pigments are comprehensively summarized.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 62 REFERENCES
Vitamin A production by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae from xylose via two-phase in situ extraction.
TLDR
These results suggest that potential limiting factors of vitamin A production in yeast, such as insufficient supply of isoprenoid precursors, and limited intracellular storage capacity, can be effectively addressed by using xylose as a carbon source, and two-phase in situ extraction.
Enhancing beta-carotene production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by metabolic engineering.
TLDR
The results indicated that mva from a prokaryotic organism might be more effective than tHMG1 for beta-carotene production in S. cerevisiae, and was achieved through specific site optimization of crtI and crtYB.
High-Level Production of Beta-Carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Successive Transformation with Carotenogenic Genes from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous
TLDR
It is succeeded in constructing an S. cerevisiae strain capable of producing high levels of β-carotene, up to 5.9 mg/g (dry weight), which was accomplished by the introduction of an additional copy of crtI and tHMG1 into carotenoid-producing yeast cells.
Enhanced isoprenoid production from xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae
TLDR
The results suggest that the problem of the rigid flux partition toward ethanol production in yeast during the production of isoprenoids and other acetyl‐CoA derived chemicals can be bypassed by using xylose instead of glucose as a carbon source.
Rational and Evolutionary Engineering Approaches Uncover a Small Set of Genetic Changes Efficient for Rapid Xylose Fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae
TLDR
Deletion of ALD6 coding for acetaldehyde dehydrogenase not only prevented acetate accumulation, but also enabled complete and efficient fermentation of xylose as well as a mixture of glucose andxylose by the evolved strain, providing direct guidance for developing industrial strains to produce cellulosic fuels and chemicals.
Saccharomyces cerevisiae Engineered for Xylose Metabolism Exhibits a Respiratory Response
TLDR
The results suggest that recombinant S. cerevisiae does not recognize xylose as a fermentable carbon source and that respiratory proteins are induced in response to cytosolic redox imbalance; however, lower sugar uptake and growth rates on xylOSE might also induce transcripts for respiration.
Increased β‐Carotene Production in Recombinant Escherichia coli Harboring an Engineered Isoprenoid Precursor Pathway with Mevalonate Addition
TLDR
Recombinant E. coli harboring pT‐DHB and pSSN12Didi was used to maximize β‐carotene production by adjusting the available amounts of glycerol, a carbon source, and mevalonate, the precursor of the meValonate bottom pathway.
...
...