Hiding in plain sight: a study on camouflage and habitat selection in a slow-moving desert herbivore

@article{Nafus2015HidingIP,
  title={Hiding in plain sight: a study on camouflage and habitat selection in a slow-moving desert herbivore},
  author={Melia Nafus and J. Germano and J. Perry and B. D. Todd and Allyson L. Walsh and R. Swaisgood},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology},
  year={2015},
  volume={26},
  pages={1389-1394}
}
© The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved. Camouflage via animal coloration and patterning is a broadly important antipredator strategy. Behavioral decision making is an influential facet of many camouflage strategies; fitness benefits often are not realized unless an organism selects suitable backgrounds. Controlled experimental studies of behavioral strategies in selection of backgrounds… Expand
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