Hide and New in the Pi-Calculus

@inproceedings{Giunti2012HideAN,
  title={Hide and New in the Pi-Calculus},
  author={Marco Giunti and Catuscia Palamidessi and Frank D. Valencia},
  booktitle={Combined International Workshop Expressiveness Concurrency and Workshop Structural Operational Semantics},
  year={2012}
}
In this paper, we enrich the pi-calculus with an operator for confidentiality (hide), whose main effect is to restrict the access to the object of the communication, thus representing confidentiality in a natural way. The hide operator is meant for local communication, and it differs from new in that it forbids the extrusion of the name and hence has a static scope. Consequently, a communication channel in the scope of a hide can be implemented as a dedicated channel, and it is more secure than… 

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