Hexagonal Single Crystal Pattern from the Spore Coat of Bacillus subtilis

@article{Hiragi1967HexagonalSC,
  title={Hexagonal Single Crystal Pattern from the Spore Coat of Bacillus subtilis},
  author={Y. Hiragi and K. Iijima and H. Kadota},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1967},
  volume={215},
  pages={154-155}
}
WE have already reported by chemical and X-ray diffraction investigations1,2 that the spore coat of Bacillus subtilis is composed of a keratin-like protein with a crystalline structure. This communication reports the results of an electron diffraction investigation designed to give further information on the structure of the spore coat. 
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