Heterotopic expression of class B floral homeotic genes supports a modified ABC model for tulip (Tulipa gesneriana)

@article{Kanno2004HeterotopicEO,
  title={Heterotopic expression of class B floral homeotic genes supports a modified ABC model for tulip (Tulipa gesneriana)},
  author={Akira Kanno and Hiroshi Saeki and Toshiaki Kameya and Heinz Saedler and G{\"u}nter Thei{\ss}en},
  journal={Plant Molecular Biology},
  year={2004},
  volume={52},
  pages={831-841}
}
In higher eudicotyledonous angiosperms the floral organs are typically arranged in four different whorls, containing sepals, petals, stamens and carpels. According to the ABC model, the identity of these organs is specified by floral homeotic genes of class A, A+B, B+C and C, respectively. In contrast to the sepal and petal whorls of eudicots, the perianths of many plants from the Liliaceae family have two outer whorls of almost identical petaloid organs, called tepals. To explain the Liliaceae… 
Heterotopic expression of B-class floral homeotic genes PISTILLATA/GLOBOSA supports a modified model for crocus (Crocus sativus L.) flower formation
TLDR
Heterotopic expression of both B-class genes: PI/GLO and AP3/DEF, known to form heterodimers for stamens and petals, explains the homeotic transformation of sepals into outer whorl tepals in this species.
Elaboration of B Gene Function to Include the Identity of Novel Floral Organs in the Lower Eudicot Aquilegia[W]
TLDR
The findings show that preexisting floral organ identity programs can be partitioned and modified to produce additional organ types, and indicate that some types of petaloid organs are not entirely dependent on AP3/PI homologs for their identity.
Suppression of B function strongly supports the modified ABCE model in Tricyrtis sp. (Liliaceae)
TLDR
This report is the first to describe the successful suppression of B function in monocotyledonous species with two-layered petaloid tepals, and the results strongly support the modified ABCE model.
Expression and Functional Analyses of Five B-class Genes in the Grape Hyacinth (Muscari armeniacum)
TLDR
Overexpression of MaGLOA1 and MaGLOB in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in a morphological change of sepals to petaloid structures in whorl 1, indicating that the function of these genes is similar that of the B-class orthologs PISTILLATA and GLO in A.Thaliana and Antirrhinum majus.
The expression of two DEFICIENS-like genes was reduced in the sepaloid tepals of viridiflora tulips
TLDR
It is suggested that reduced expression of the two DEF-like genes, TGDEFA and TGDEFB, is involved in the development of the viridiflora phenotype, which could be caused by the amino acid difference.
Two GLOBOSA-like genes are expressed in second and third whorls of homochlamydeous flowers in Asparagus officinalis L.
TLDR
This study isolated and characterized two GLOBOSA-like genes (AOGLOA and AOGLOB), one of class B gene, from asparagus, and indicated that the class B genes are not involved in the outer tepal development in asparagine, not supporting the modified ABC model in asParagus.
Evolution of petaloid sepals independent of shifts in B-class MADS box gene expression
TLDR
Developmental characteristics of petaloid sepals in Rhodochiton atrosanguineum, a close relative of the model species Antirrhinum majus (snapdragon), are investigated and suggests multiple convergent pathways for the evolution of showy sepals.
The modified ABC model explains the development of the petaloid perianth of Agapanthus praecox ssp. orientalis (Agapanthaceae) flowers
TLDR
The homologs of the Antirrhinum majus genes GLOBOSA and DEFICIENS in this plant were isolated and characterized and indicated that the flower developmental mechanism of Agapanthus follows the modified ABC model.
Analysis of B-Class Genes NAP3L3 and NAP3L4 in Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis
TLDR
The cloning of two full-length B-class genes, namely NAP3L3 and N AP3L4, that are orthologs of the DEFICIENS lineage are reported, suggesting that these two genes might not be involved in the formation of petaloid sepals in Chinese narcissus.
Suppression of B function by chimeric repressor gene-silencing technology (CRES-T) reduces the petaloid tepal identity in transgenic Lilium sp.
Some monocotyledonous plants, including liliaceous, amaryllidaceous and iridaceous ones, produce flowers with petaloid tepals in whorls 1 and 2 organs. For explaining the molecular mechanism of
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TLDR
The functions of two rice MADS-box genes were studied by the loss-of-function approach and results suggest that OsMADS4 belongs to the class B gene family and OsM ADS3 belongs toThe class C gene family of floral organ identity determination.
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TLDR
These findings indicate that although some aspects of the ABC program are conserved, others display a high degree of plasticity and may not have become fixed until later in angiosperm evolution.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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