Herpes simplex virus vaccines--why don't antibodies protect?

@article{Mascola1999HerpesSV,
  title={Herpes simplex virus vaccines--why don't antibodies protect?},
  author={John R. Mascola},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={1999},
  volume={282 4},
  pages={
          379-80
        }
}
MOST EFFECTIVE VIRAL VACCINES WORK, AT LEAST in part, by inducing antibodies capable of neutralizing the invading virus. Examples among licensed human vaccines include measles, polio, rabies, influenza, hepatitis A, and hepatitis B vaccines. Even for diseases such as chickenpox, in which cellular immunity is thought to control disease, administration of specific antibody (eg, varicella-zoster immune globulin) can protect against disease when administered up to 96 hours following viral exposure… CONTINUE READING

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