Herpes simplex virus-1 and varicella-zoster virus latency in ganglia

@article{Mitchell2011HerpesSV,
  title={Herpes simplex virus-1 and varicella-zoster virus latency in ganglia},
  author={Bradley M. Mitchell and David Bloom and Randall J. Cohrs and Donald H. Gilden and Peter G. E. Kennedy},
  journal={Journal of NeuroVirology},
  year={2011},
  volume={9},
  pages={194-204}
}
Two human alpha-herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and varicella zoster virus (VZV), account for the most frequent and serious neurologic disease caused by any of the eight human herpesviruses. Both HSV-1 and VZV become latent in ganglia. In this review, the authors describe features of latency for these viruses, such as distribution, prevalence, abundance, and configuration of viral DNA in latently infected human ganglia, as well as transcription, translation, and cell type infected… Expand
A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation.
TLDR
There is increasing evidence that HSV-1 and VZV latency is epigenetically regulated, and in vitro models that permit pathway analysis and identification of both epigenetic modulations and global transcriptional mechanisms hold much promise for the future understanding in this complex area. Expand
Herpes simplex virus and varicella zoster virus, the house guests who never leave
TLDR
This review will highlight the differences in infection pattern, immune response, and pathogenesis associated with HSV-1 and VZV. Expand
Herpes virus infection of the peripheral nervous system.
  • I. Steiner
  • Medicine
  • Handbook of clinical neurology
  • 2013
TLDR
The present review details the virology and molecular biology underlying the human infection and detailed description of the symtomatology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, course, therapy, and prognosis of disorders of the peripheral nervous system caused by these viruses. Expand
Varicella-zoster virus human ganglionic latency: a current summary
TLDR
It is now established beyond doubt that latent VZV is predominantly located in human ganglionic neurons and virus gene transcription during latency is epigenetically regulated, and appears to be restricted to expression of at least six genes, with expression of gene 63 being the hallmark of latency. Expand
Varicella-Zoster Virus infected human neurons are resistant to apoptosis
TLDR
Findings showed that neurons are resistant to VZV-induced apoptosis, which may have relevance to the switching of VzV from a lytic to latent ganglionic neuronal infection. Expand
Herpes Simplex Virus and Varicella-Zoster Virus.
TLDR
Nucleic acid detection methods are the best choice, and sometimes the only choice, for detecting HSV or VZV in blood, cerebrospinal fluid, aqueous or vitreous humor, and from mucosal surfaces. Expand
Concurrent detection of herpes simplex and varicella-zoster viruses by polymerase chain reaction from the same anatomic location.
Herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) may cause latent infection of the same peripheral nerve ganglia. However, there are no large studies addressing the frequency of concurrentExpand
Herpes simplex and herpes zoster viruses in COVID-19 patients
TLDR
The University of Florida patient registry i2b2 with ICD-10 diagnosis codes was used for retrieval of patients with diagnosis of COVID-19 and each of the other viruses over the period of October 2015–June 2020 to assess the prevalence of herpes simplex-1 and varicella zoster viruses. Expand
Ocular and neural distribution of feline herpesvirus-1 during active and latent experimental infection in cats
TLDR
To the author’s knowledge, this is the first report of FeHV-1 infection involving intraocular structures and autonomic ganglia and a strong correlation existed between clinical score and day 30 viral DNA copy number within the TG. Expand
Latent versus productive infection: the alpha herpesvirus switch.
TLDR
In this review, insights gained from in vitro latency models are discussed with a focus on the neuronal and viral factors that determine the mode of infection. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 133 REFERENCES
The problems of latent varicella zoster virus in human ganglia: precise cell location and viral content.
TLDR
Any attempt to prevent virus reactivation must begin with an understanding of the physical state of virus during latency, not the least of which is identification of the cell type in human ganglia which harbors virus. Expand
Quantitation of Latent Varicella-Zoster Virus and Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes in Human Trigeminal Ganglia
TLDR
Levels of latent viral genome loads have implications for virus distribution in and reactivation from human sensory ganglia and are quantitated using real-time fluorescence PCR. Expand
Latent varicella-zoster virus is located predominantly in neurons in human trigeminal ganglia.
TLDR
The neuron is the predominant site of latent VZV in human trigeminal ganglia, according to a number of conflicting reports regarding the cellular location of latentVZV within human ganglia. Expand
Neurologic complications of the reactivation of varicella-zoster virus.
TLDR
The detection of varicella–zoster virus in blood vessels and other tissues by methods based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has widened the recognized patterns of infection. Expand
Varicella-zoster virus
  • A. Arvin
  • Medicine
  • Clinical microbiology reviews
  • 1996
TLDR
A live attenuated varicella vaccine (Oka/Merck strain) is now recommended for routine childhood immunization and passive antibody prophylaxis withvaricella-zoster immune globulin is indicated for susceptible high-risk patients exposed to variceella. Expand
Aberrant intracellular localization of Varicella-Zoster virus regulatory proteins during latency.
TLDR
By immunohistochemical analysis of ganglia obtained at autopsy from seropositive patients without clinical symptoms of VZV infection that viral regulatory proteins are present in latently infected neurons, it is demonstrated that these proteins predominantly are detected in the cytoplasm of latent infected neurons. Expand
Analysis of Individual Human Trigeminal Ganglia for Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Varicella-Zoster Virus Nucleic Acids Using Real-Time PCR
TLDR
It appears that, similar to LAT transcription in HSV-1 latently infected ganglia, VzV gene 63 transcription is a hallmark of VZV latency. Expand
Spontaneous molecular reactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 latency in mice
TLDR
It is concluded that productive cycle viral genes are abundantly expressed in rare neurons of latently infected murine TG and that these events are promptly recognized by an active local immune response. Expand
Varicella-zoster virus DNA in human sensory ganglia
TLDR
The detection of VZV DNA sequences in an acutely infected human sacral ganglion and in normal trigeminal ganglia support the hypothesis that VzV is latent in normal human ganglia. Expand
Latent varicella-zoster viral DNA in human trigeminal and thoracic ganglia.
TLDR
Findings indicate that after primary infection with varicella-zoster virus (varicella), the virus becomes latent in many ganglia--more often in the trigeminal ganglia than in any thoracic ganglion--and that more than one region of the viral genome is present during latency. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...