Herpes simplex encephalitis An immunohistological study of the distribution of viral antigen within the brain

@article{Esiri1982HerpesSE,
  title={Herpes simplex encephalitis An immunohistological study of the distribution of viral antigen within the brain},
  author={Margaret M. Esiri},
  journal={Journal of the Neurological Sciences},
  year={1982},
  volume={54},
  pages={209-226}
}
  • M. Esiri
  • Published 1982
  • Medicine
  • Journal of the Neurological Sciences
An immunoperoxidase technique was used to map the sites of herpes simplex virus antigen (VA) within the brain in 29 autopsied cases of herpes simplex encephalitis. Attention was directed particularly to those parts of the brain that are known from pathological studies to be involved in the disease. Material was studied from cases surviving for varying periods from a few days to a few years after the onset of neurological disease. VA was found within the brain in all cases dying within 3 weeks… Expand
Distribution of herpes simplex virus DNA in the brains of human long-term survivors of encephalitis
TLDR
It is suggested that HSV-1 may persist within the human central nervous system after acute herpes simplex encephalitis, and the distribution of the viral DNA correlates better with that of the persistent inflammatory infiltrate than with the destructive lesions of the acute encephalopathy. Expand
Herpes-simplex-related antigen in human demyelinative disease and encephalitis
TLDR
Paraffin sections from human central nervous system tissues from 31 cases pathologically diagnosed as multiple sclerosis, 34 cases of other neurological diseases, 4 adult cases of HSV encephalitis, and mouse brains infected with various HSV strains were examined, suggesting HSV-related antigen may be found in a broader spectrum of human CNS lesions than has previously been recognized. Expand
Neurological disease and herpes simplex virus
TLDR
Only two patients with Alzheimer's disease showed areas of brain positive for HSV antigen (VA), which suggests “coincidental disease” processes within these two patients and means that any hypothesis implicating HSV as an aetiological agent in degenerative disease must still remain extremely speculative. Expand
Herpes simplex virus antigen detection in human acute encephalitis:
TLDR
Results suggests that, because of its high sensitivity, ABC method permits viral antigen detection not feasible with other methods, however, this method lacks of accuracy for HSV typing mainly because of probable antigens changes resulting from tissue processing. Expand
Concurrent herpes simplex type 1 necrotizing encephalitis, cytomegalovirus ventriculoencephalitis and cerebral lymphoma in an AIDS patient
TLDR
Herpes simplex virus type 1 was shown in the nuclei and cytoplasm of certain neurons and astrocytes in the borders of the necrotized temporal lobe areas by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization and electron microscopy, whereas in situ Hybridization and immunohistsochemistry for CMV were negative in such areas. Expand
Herpes simplex virus encephalitis in a mouse model: PCR evidence for CNS latency following acute infection
TLDR
The findings suggest that latent infection by HSV-1 may be relatively readily established in the CNS as well as in sensory ganglia, and the frequency of establishment of latency appears to be related to the neuroanatomical accessibility of each brain region to the site of entry of the virus. Expand
Immunohistological studies of immunoglobulin-containing cells and viral antigens in some inflammatory diseases of the nervous system.
Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the findings obtained from studies conducted on a number of inflammatory diseases using the immunoperoxidase technique to detect immunoglobulin-containingExpand
Herpes simplex encephalitis Immunohistological demonstration of spread of virus via olfactory pathways in mice
Six-week-old Balb/c mice were inoculated intranasally with a suspension of HSV1 virus and the distribution of viral antigen in the brain 3-7 days later was surveyed using the immunoperoxidaseExpand
Autopsy neuropathological findings in ‘burnt out’ herpes simplex encephalitis and use of the polymerase chain reaction to detect viral DNA
TLDR
The hypothesis that herpes simplex virus may persist within the central nervous system after acute herpes encephalitis, to cause latent or low‐grade productive infection, is supported. Expand
Immunocytochemical localization of herpes simplex virus antigen in the trigeminal ganglia of experimentally infected mice
TLDR
The appearance of infected ganglion cells during the transition to latency suggests that neurons can be switched from an HSV-permissive to a non- permissive (latent) state. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 55 REFERENCES
Herpes simplex encephalitis Immunohistological demonstration of spread of virus via olfactory pathways in mice
Six-week-old Balb/c mice were inoculated intranasally with a suspension of HSV1 virus and the distribution of viral antigen in the brain 3-7 days later was surveyed using the immunoperoxidaseExpand
Herpes simplex encephalitis: a clinical and pathological analysis of twenty-two cases
TLDR
The present problem is that the firmest diagnosis is made in those patients who are most seriously ill, so that what have come to be accepted as the 'typical' clinical picture and the characteristic histopathology may in fact represent only one part of a wide clinical spectrum. Expand
THE PATHOGENESIS OF HERPES VIRUS ENCEPHALITIS : I. VIRUS PATHWAYS TO THE NERVOUS SYSTEM OF SUCKLING MICE DEMONSTRATED BY FLUORESCENT ANTIBODY STAINING
TLDR
The pathogenesis of herpes simplex virus encephalitis and myelitis was studied in suckling mice using routine titration procedures and fluorescent antibody staining for the identification of infected cells and there was no evidence of axonal spread of virus in the host-virus system studied. Expand
Herpes simplex virus DNA sequences in the CNS of latently infected mice
TLDR
The results suggest that viruses that progress from the PNS into the CNS are not eliminated, but are capable of establishing a latent infection in the CNS that cannot be reactivated by explantation techniques. Expand
Isolation of herpesviruses from trigeminal ganglia of man, monkeys, and cats.
  • G. Plummer
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The Journal of infectious diseases
  • 1973
TLDR
The trigeminal ganglia have been suggested as the site of persistence of herpes simplex virus, a hypothesis supported to some extent by the frequent appearance of herpes lesions on the denervated area of the face within a short time of surgical section of the trigemINAL nerve root, and by the recent recovery of herpessimplex virus from the trigenital ganglia of autopsied patients. Expand
Latent herpes simplex virus trigeminal ganglionic infection in mice and demyelination in the central nervous system
TLDR
Histologically, trigeminal ganglia revealed infiltrations of inflammatory cells even 6 months after inoculation with herpes simplex virus, and small areas of demyelination were still detectable 3 and 6 months p.i. but there were then also signs of remyelinations. Expand
CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM SUSCEPTIBILITY TO HERPES SIMPLEX INFECTION
TLDR
Four days after inoculation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) on the rabbit cornea, distinctive and reproducible lesions appear in the trigeminal root entry zone, providing an easily reproducible model for further investigation of the response of nervous system tissue to HSV. Expand
Intra-axonal location of herpes simplex virus particles.
TLDR
There is increasing evidence that herpes simplex virus may reach the central nervous system along peripheral nerves and the recent work of Kristensson, Lycke & Sjostrand (1971a) gives further weight to the much older hypothesis that the most important mode of spread is inside the axons. Expand
The progression of herpes simplex virus to the central nervous system of the mouse.
  • P. Wildy
  • Medicine
  • The Journal of hygiene
  • 1967
TLDR
It appears that invasion of the central nervous system takes place only by way of the peripheral nerve, and paralysis is not prevented by circulating neutralizing antibody given 18 hours after inoculation. Expand
DETECTION OF HERPES-SIMPLEX VIRAL GENOME IN BRAIN TISSUE
Herpes-simplex virus type (HSV-1) nucleic-acid sequences were detected by in-situ hybridisation in thin sections of brains from mice which had been inoculated 24 weeks previously with HSV-1. TheseExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...