Heroin-associated nephropathy

@article{Dettmeyer2005HeroinassociatedN,
  title={Heroin-associated nephropathy},
  author={Reinhard B. Dettmeyer and Johanna Preuss and Heike Wollersen and Burkhard Madea},
  journal={Expert Opinion on Drug Safety},
  year={2005},
  volume={4},
  pages={19 - 28}
}
Since the first reports in the late 1960s and early 1970s there have been numerous studies describing the clinical and pathological features of renal diseases associated with chronic parenteral abuse of heroin, cocaine, morphine, amphetamine, and other narcotic and hallucinogenic drugs, including several adulterants. The past 35years have witnessed an explosive growth in illicit drug use in many parts of the world. Meanwhile, drug addict nephropathy constitutes an important cause of end-stage… Expand
Histopathology and Drug Abuse
One-off or regular use of drugs in the narrower sense, i.e., heroin, cocaine, amphetamines, ecstasy, or the inhalation of hairspray, can lead to numerous histopathological findings: pulmonaryExpand
Renal amyloidosis in intravenous heroin addicts with nephrotic syndrome and renal failure.
TLDR
Renal AA amyloidosis among heroin addicts seems to be associated with chronic suppurative skin infections and should always be considered in chronic heroin addicts presenting with proteinuria and renal impairment. Expand
Nephrotoxicity after recreational drug use. Case report
TLDR
A case of acute kidney injury in a young man after the recreational use of alcohol, cocaine and opioids is reported, the pathological findings are described and a brief review of the literature is presented. Expand
Widespread pulmonary granulomatosis following long time intravenous drug abuse--a case report.
TLDR
The case of a 32-year old man, dying suddenly and unexpectedly after a well-known history of drug abuse for more than a decade, is reported, for the first time, lung dust in such a case was characterised by energy dispersive X-ray (EDX). Expand
Drugs and the kidneyDrugs and toxins that damage the kidney
TLDR
A thorough drug history, including recent changes in medications, over-the-counter medications and abused drugs, is mandatory and some of the commoner and more important presentations are presented. Expand
Pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetic variability of heroin and its metabolites: review of the literature.
This article reviews the pharmacokinetics of heroin after intravenous, oral, intranasal, intramuscular and rectal application and after inhalation in humans, with a special focus on heroinExpand
Morphine for the Treatment of Pain in Sickle Cell Disease
TLDR
The aim of this review is to develop strategies that may prevent the inadvertent effect of opioids on organ function in SCD, should it occur, without compromising analgesia. Expand
Chasing the Dragon: A Review of Toxic Leukoencephalopathy
TLDR
The popularity of smoking heroin is growing in the United States, and it is particularly seen with increasing frequency in new heroin users, and this is an important, and likely increasingly common, effect of illicit drug use that should be recognized by forensic pathologists. Expand
Nefrotoxicidad por uso recreacional de drogas psicoactivas. Reporte de un caso
TLDR
A case of acute kidney injury in a young man after the recreational use of alcohol, cocaine and opioids is reported, the pathological findings are described and a brief review of the literature is presented. Expand
DARK Classics in Chemical Neuroscience: Heroin and Desomorphine.
TLDR
A drop in Afghan heroin production and its "exports" to Russia gave rise to a wide consumption of desomorphine in ex-Soviet republics during the first decade of 21st century, representing an economical and accessible alternative for misusers to this sort of derivative. Expand
...
1
2
3
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 106 REFERENCES
Chronic sclerosing glomerulopathy (heroin-associated nephropathy) in intravenous T's and Blues abusers.
TLDR
The term opiate nephropathy is suggested for this lesion in narcotics users, indicating its potential occurrence in non-heroin-using drug addicts. Expand
Natural history of heroin-associated nephropathy.
TLDR
Of 14 black heroin addicts with massive proteinuria, 12 manifested a typical syndrome including edema, hypoalbuminemia and hypercholesterolemia, so that in all eight patients with follow-up examinations, uremia developed in six to 48 months. Expand
Heroin nephropathy. A clinicopathologic and epidemiologic study.
TLDR
This investigation confirms the existence of heroin-associated sclerosing glomerulonephritis in black men and appears to be a major risk factor for ESRD in the Buffalo-SMSA. Expand
Disappearance of uremia due to heroin-associated nephropathy.
  • E. Friedman, T. Tao
  • Medicine
  • American journal of kidney diseases : the official journal of the National Kidney Foundation
  • 1995
Heroin-associated nephropathy (HAN), a complication of intravenous heroin abuse, was initially recognized at Kings County Hospital in Brooklyn, NY, in the early 1970s. Our recent experience indicatesExpand
Amyloidosis in subcutaneous heroin abusers ("skin poppers' amyloidosis").
TLDR
Prolonged survival of heroin abusers and exhaustion of intravenous access requiring recourse to the subcutaneous route underlie the occurrence of amyloidosis in the addict population. Expand
The changing spectrum of heroin-associated nephropathy.
TLDR
The development of renal amyloidosis in patients appears to be related to a longer duration of heroin abuse with increased incidence of subcutaneous injection of the narcotic. Expand
Adulterants in heroin/cocaine: implications concerning heroin-associated nephropathy.
TLDR
Data provided by the DEA concerning the laboratory analysis of samples of heroin/cocaine analyzed for the presence of various adulterants or secondary substances suggest that further animal research is needed to determine the effects of repeated intravenous injections of each of these commonly found substances on the kidney. Expand
Heroin associated nephropathy: clinical and histological studies in 19 patients.
TLDR
The fact that the renal abnormalities of the authors' patients could not be explained by other diseases and the marked improvement upon cessation of the addiction favors the notion that heroin addiction "per se" may be the cause of the nephropathy. Expand
Renal Lesions in Heroin Addicts
TLDR
Percutaneous biopsies were performed in 14 unselected addicts, who had no manifest cardiac, hepatic or sickle-cell disorder, and asymptomatic renal lesions herein described may represent early manifestation of kidney disease as a consequence of drug usage and deserve further investigation. Expand
Drugs of abuse and renal disease.
The complications of drug abuse encompass a spectrum of glomerular, interstitial, and vascular diseases. They comprise the heroin-associated nephropathy seen in African-American intravenous drugExpand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...