Heroes, Mummies, and Treasure: Near Eastern Archaeology in the Movies

@article{Mcgeough2006HeroesMA,
  title={Heroes, Mummies, and Treasure: Near Eastern Archaeology in the Movies},
  author={K. Mcgeough},
  journal={Near Eastern Archaeology},
  year={2006},
  volume={69},
  pages={174 - 185}
}
The general public has associated Near Eastern archae ology with adventure from the very beginnings of this discipline.1 In the ill-fated expeditions to the Bible lands sent by Frederick V of Denmark, the adventure tales of Austen Henry Layard, and the romantic illustrations of the Napoleonic expedition, Near Eastern archaeologists' own narratives have invoked images of danger and excitement for public consumption. These narratives were deliberately provided to the public and have remained very… Expand
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