Heritage or Imperial Violence: A Hidden History of Early Ming Princely Acquisition of Art

@article{Pang2016HeritageOI,
  title={Heritage or Imperial Violence: A Hidden History of Early Ming Princely Acquisition of Art},
  author={Huiping Pang},
  journal={Ming Studies},
  year={2016},
  volume={2016},
  pages={2 - 26}
}
The bequeathing of property within a royal family is ostensibly a clean transfer governed by clear legal codes. In the case of the Ming imperial court, many assume that imperial collections were commonly gifted from the cosmopolitan capital to the peripheral princedoms. A long-standing hypothesis holds that the first Ming emperor, Hongwu (r. 1368–98) bestowed a collection of fourth- to fourteenth-century canonical paintings and calligraphies to his sons Zhu Gang (1358–98) and Zhu Tan (1370–89… 
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