Heritability is not Evolvability

@article{Hansen2011HeritabilityIN,
  title={Heritability is not Evolvability},
  author={T. F. Hansen and C. P{\'e}labon and D. Houle},
  journal={Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={38},
  pages={258-277}
}
Short-term evolutionary potential depends on the additive genetic variance in the population. The additive variance is often measured as heritability, the fraction of the total phenotypic variance that is additive. Heritability is thus a common measure of evolutionary potential. An alternative is to measure evolutionary potential as expected proportional change under a unit strength of selection. This yields the mean-scaled additive variance as a measure of evolvability. Houle in Genetics 130… Expand

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