Heritability and linkage analysis of hand, foot, and eye preference in Mexican Americans

@article{Warren2006HeritabilityAL,
  title={Heritability and linkage analysis of hand, foot, and eye preference in Mexican Americans},
  author={Diane M. Warren and Michael P. Stern and Ravindranath Duggirala and Thomas D. Dyer and Laura Almasy},
  journal={Laterality},
  year={2006},
  volume={11},
  pages={508 - 524}
}
Functional lateralities are of interest due to their relationship with cerebral lateralisation and language development. However, genes influencing sidedness remain elusive. We measured direction and consistency of hand, foot, and eye preference in 584 Mexican-Americans from families participating in the San Antonio Family Diabetes/Gallbladder Study. Using maximum-likelihood-based variance components methods, we estimated weak (.11 ≤ h2≤.17) but significant heritability for foot preference, eye… 
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