Hereditary and Acquired Antithrombin Deficiency

@article{Maclean2012HereditaryAA,
  title={Hereditary and Acquired Antithrombin Deficiency},
  author={Peter S Maclean and Robert Campbell Tait},
  journal={Drugs},
  year={2012},
  volume={67},
  pages={1429-1440}
}
Antithrombin is a glycoprotein critical to the regulation of coagulation. Its primary action is the inhibition of the activated coagulation factors IIa (thrombin) and Xa. In addition there is growing evidence to suggest that antithrombin also plays a role in the inhibition of inflammation within the environment of the vascular endothelium. Reduced plasma antithrombin may result from congenital deficiency or arise secondarily from a range of disorders such as liver dysfunction, premature infancy… Expand
Clinical syndromes associated with acquired antithrombin deficiency via microvascular leakage and the related risk of thrombosis.
TLDR
Clinical settings characterized by an acquired AT deficiency largely or partly subsequent to protein microvascular leakage are reviewed and the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms underlying endothelial AT leakage and on the consequences of this protein decrease are provided, specifically looking at thrombosis. Expand
Hereditary Antithrombin Deficiency with Hemorrhagic Cerebral Infarction and Cardiac Thrombosis Occurred in Neonatal Period: A Case Report
TLDR
This case is a rare thrombotic event that occured early year in due to AT deficiency in a 25-day-old male infant referred to Severance Children's Hospital for hemorrhagic cerebral infarction with hydrocephalus. Expand
Antithrombin deficiency: A pediatric disorder.
INTRODUCTION Hereditary antithrombin (AT) deficiency is an autosomal dominant thrombophilic disorder. Guidelines do not support routine testing of children based on personal or familial thrombosis.Expand
Monitoring of heparins in antithrombin-deficient patients.
TLDR
Reduced antithrombin activity causes significantly reduced anti-Xa levels and standard LWMH- or UFH-doses are likely to lead to under treatment in antityrombin-deficient individuals. Expand
Cerebral venous thrombosis during pregnancy in the setting of type I antithrombin deficiency: case report and literature review.
TLDR
The case of a female with heterozygous type I antithrombin deficiency who presented with a central nervous system transverse sinus thrombosis in the third trimester of pregnancy despite the use of therapeutic doses of low molecular weight heparin, as venous thromboembolic prophylaxis, since conception lends further debate to the issue of whether antitrombin concentrate, in addition to anticoagulation, should be routinely administered. Expand
How I treat heterozygous hereditary antithrombin deficiency in pregnancy.
TLDR
In antithrombin deficiency the use of low-molecular-weight heparin in pregnancy and puerperium with antithROMbin concentrate pre-delivery was associated with successful pregnancy outcome; rates of VTE appear to be lower than previously reported, but remain elevated. Expand
Thrombophilia and Pregnancy
TLDR
Hereditary and acquired thrombophilias present challenges across the continuum of pregnancy and the puerperal period and a synthesis of the most relevant evidence regarding risk association and the efficacy of prevention and treatment paradigms is required. Expand
Successful administration of recombinant human antithrombin in a pregnant Japanese woman with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.
TLDR
It was concluded that rhAT was effective for preventing VTE during delivery, with no potential infection risks, to a pregnant Japanese woman with AT deficiency. Expand
Exogenous supplementation of antithrombin III in adult and pediatric patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation
TLDR
The findings suggest that the use of antithrombin III restores heparin responsiveness in patients with low antithROMbin III activity and low anti-Xa activity. Expand
Efficacy and safety of apixaban in a patient with systemic venous thromboembolism associated with hereditary antithrombin deficiency.
TLDR
The efficacy of a single apixaban prescription in achieving excellent outcomes in resolving systemic VTE with no bleeding events is highlighted. Expand
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