Herbivory from Individuals to Ecosystems

@article{Schmitz2008HerbivoryFI,
  title={Herbivory from Individuals to Ecosystems},
  author={Oswald J. Schmitz},
  journal={Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics},
  year={2008},
  volume={39},
  pages={133-152}
}
  • O. Schmitz
  • Published 2008
  • Biology
  • Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics
Herbivores not only consume resources, but they are resources for other consumers. Consequently, they have much potential to mediate effects that cascade up and down trophic chains in ecosystems. The way those effects are mediated depends on individual-scale properties of herbivores including constraints determining resource limitation, herbivore feeding mode, the adaptive trade-off to balance nutrient intake and predation risk avoidance, and the need to maintain homeostatic balance of… Expand

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