Hepatotoxicity of green tea: an update

@article{Mazzanti2015HepatotoxicityOG,
  title={Hepatotoxicity of green tea: an update},
  author={Gabriela Mazzanti and Antonella Di Sotto and Annabella Vitalone},
  journal={Archives of Toxicology},
  year={2015},
  volume={89},
  pages={1175-1191}
}
Green tea (GT), obtained from the leaves of Camellia sinensis (L.) Kuntze (Fam. Theaceae), is largely used for its potential health benefits such as reduction in risk of cardiovascular diseases and weight loss. Nevertheless, it is suspected to induce liver damage. Present work reviews the hepatic adverse reactions associated with GT-based herbal supplements, published by the end of 2008 to March 2015. A systematic research was carried out on PubMed, MedlinePlus, Scopus and Google Scholar… Expand
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