Hepatitis C virus infection during pregnancy and the newborn period – are they opportunities for treatment?

@article{Arshad2011HepatitisCV,
  title={Hepatitis C virus infection during pregnancy and the newborn period – are they opportunities for treatment?},
  author={M. Arshad and Samer S. El-Kamary and Ravi Jhaveri},
  journal={Journal of Viral Hepatitis},
  year={2011},
  volume={18}
}
Summary.  The worldwide prevalence of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in pregnant women is estimated to be between 1 and 8% and in children between 0.05% and 5%. While parenteral transmission is still common in children living in developing countries, perinatal transmission is now the leading cause of HCV transmission in developed countries. The absence of an HCV vaccine or approved therapy during pregnancy means that prevention of vertical transmission is still not possible. However, a low… Expand
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