Hepatitis C virus contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating metabolic and intracellular signaling pathways

@article{Koike2007HepatitisCV,
  title={Hepatitis C virus contributes to hepatocarcinogenesis by modulating metabolic and intracellular signaling pathways},
  author={Kazuhiko Koike},
  journal={Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology},
  year={2007},
  volume={22}
}
  • K. Koike
  • Published 2007
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Persistent infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor for development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, it remains controversial in the pathogenesis of HCC associated with HCV as to whether the virus plays a direct or an indirect role. The studies using transgenic mouse models, in which the core protein of HCV has an oncogenic potential, indicate that HCV is directly involved in hepatocarcinogenesis, albeit other factors such as continued cell death and regeneration… Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Although transgenic mouse models have remarkable advantages, they are intrinsically accompanied by some drawbacks when used to study human diseases, and the results obtained should be carefully interpreted in the context of whether or not they are well associated with human pathogenesis. Expand
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