Hemorrhagic fever viruses as biological weapons: medical and public health management.

@article{Borio2002HemorrhagicFV,
  title={Hemorrhagic fever viruses as biological weapons: medical and public health management.},
  author={Luciana L. Borio and Thomas V Inglesby and Clarence J. Peters and Alan L. Schmaljohn and James M. Hughes and Peter B. Jahrling and Thomas Ksiazek and Karl M. Johnson and Andrea Meyerhoff and Tara O'Toole and Michael S. Ascher and John G. Bartlett and Joel G. Breman and Edward M. Eitzen and Margaret A. Hamburg and Jerome Hauer and Donald Ainslie Henderson and Richard T. Johnson and Gigi Kwik and Marci Layton and Scott R. Lillibridge and Gary J. Nabel and Michael T. Osterholm and Trish M. Perl and Philip K. Russell and Kevin Tonat},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2002},
  volume={287 18},
  pages={
          2391-405
        }
}
OBJECTIVE To develop consensus-based recommendations for measures to be taken by medical and public health professionals if hemorrhagic fever viruses (HFVs) are used as biological weapons against a civilian population. [...] Key MethodEVIDENCE MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to January 2002. Retrieved references, relevant material published prior to 1966, and additional sources identified by participants were reviewed. Expand
Management of infectious agents of bioterrorism
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Defense against filoviruses used as biological weapons.
  • M. Bray
  • Medicine
  • Antiviral research
  • 2003
TLDR
Terrorists might have great difficulty acquiring a filovirus for use as a weapon, but this attempt to do so because of the agents' ability to inspire fear is an attempt to prevent panic in the event of an attack. Expand
Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses
TLDR
The biological weapons potential of and defense against the major hemorrhagic fever viruses are discussed. Expand
Viral hemorrhagic fever.
TLDR
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Medical Countermeasures for Filoviruses and Other Viral Agents
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  • Medicine
  • Biosecurity and bioterrorism : biodefense strategy, practice, and science
  • 2003
TLDR
The focus is on the challenges that widespread implementation of rigorous infection control practices would pose to hospital operations, especially were hospitals required to deliver medical care for unusually high numbers of patients after a bioterrorist attack. Expand
History of U.S. military contributions to the study of viral hemorrhagic fevers.
TLDR
The characteristics of the viral hemorrhagic fever viruses as arthropod-borne or rodent-borne viruses that can result in human illnesses with high morbidity and mortality rates make these viruses a unique threat, historically, currently, and in the future, to deployed soldiers around the world. Expand
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Being Prepared: Bioterrorism and Mass Prophylaxis: Part I
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