Hemolysis induced by an extreme mountain ultra-marathon is not associated with a decrease in total red blood cell volume.

@article{Robach2014HemolysisIB,
  title={Hemolysis induced by an extreme mountain ultra-marathon is not associated with a decrease in total red blood cell volume.},
  author={Paul Robach and R-C Boisson and Lucile Vincent and Carsten Lundby and St{\'e}phane Moutereau and Laurent Gergel{\'e} and Nadia Michel and Eva Duthil and L{\'e}onard F{\'e}asson and Guillaume Y Millet},
  journal={Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports},
  year={2014},
  volume={24 1},
  pages={18-27}
}
Prolonged running is known to induce hemolysis. It has been suggested that hemolysis may lead to a significant loss of red blood cells; however, its actual impact on the erythrocyte pool is unknown. Here, we test the hypothesis that prolonged running with high hemolytic potential decreases total red blood cell volume (RCV). Hemolysis (n = 22) and RCV (n = 19) were quantified in ultra-marathon runners before and after a 166-km long mountain ultra-endurance marathon (RUN) with 9500 m of altitude… CONTINUE READING
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