Hemispheric specialization in Australian magpies (Gymnorhina tibicen) shown as eye preferences during response to a predator

@article{Koboroff2008HemisphericSI,
  title={Hemispheric specialization in Australian magpies (Gymnorhina tibicen) shown as eye preferences during response to a predator},
  author={A. Koboroff and G. Kaplan and L. Rogers},
  journal={Brain Research Bulletin},
  year={2008},
  volume={76},
  pages={304-306}
}
Brain lateralization in birds is frequently expressed as a preference to view stimuli with one eye using the lateral monocular visual field. As few studies have investigated lateralized behaviour in wild birds, we scored eye preferences of Australian magpies (Gymnorhina tibicen) performing anti-predator responses. When animals deal with potential predators by mobbing them, constant assessment is needed to consider whether to approach, mob or withdraw. When presented with a taxidermic specimen… Expand
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