Hemispheric specialization for English and ASL: left invariance-right variability.

@article{Bavelier1998HemisphericSF,
  title={Hemispheric specialization for English and ASL: left invariance-right variability.},
  author={Daphne Bavelier and David P. Corina and Peter Jezzard and Vincent P. Clark and Avi Karni and Anil Lalwani and Josef P. Rauschecker and Allen Braun and Robert Turner and Helen J. Neville},
  journal={Neuroreport},
  year={1998},
  volume={9 7},
  pages={1537-42}
}
Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to compare the cerebral organization during sentence processing in English and in American sign language (ASL). Classical language areas within the left hemisphere were recruited by both English in native speakers and ASL in native signers. This suggests a bias of the left hemisphere to process natural languages independently of the modality through which language is perceived. Furthermore, in contrast to English, ASL strongly recruited… CONTINUE READING