Hemispheric lateralization of functions related to emotion

@article{Silberman1986HemisphericLO,
  title={Hemispheric lateralization of functions related to emotion},
  author={Edward Silberman and Herbert J. Weingartner},
  journal={Brain and Cognition},
  year={1986},
  volume={5},
  pages={322-353}
}
We have reviewed the evidence that processes and functions related to perception and expression of emotions are represented asymmetrically in the cerebral hemispheres. The literature describes three possible aspects of emotional lateralization: that emotions are better recognized by the right hemisphere; that control of emotional expression and related behaviors takes place principally in the right hemisphere; and that the right hemisphere is specialized for dealing with negative emotions… 
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