Hemiparetic stroke impairs anticipatory control of arm movement

@article{Takahashi2003HemipareticSI,
  title={Hemiparetic stroke impairs anticipatory control of arm movement},
  author={Craig D. Takahashi and David J. Reinkensmeyer},
  journal={Experimental Brain Research},
  year={2003},
  volume={149},
  pages={131-140}
}
Internal models are sensory motor mappings used by the nervous system to anticipate the force requirements of movement tasks. The ability to use internal models likely underlies the development of skillful control of the arm throughout life. It is currently unknown to what extent individuals with hemiparetic stroke can form and implement such internal models. To examine this issue, we measured whether such individuals could learn to anticipate forces applied to their arms by a lightweight… CONTINUE READING

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