Hemifacial spasm non-motor and motor-related symptoms and their response to botulinum toxin therapy

@article{Rudzinska2010HemifacialSN,
  title={Hemifacial spasm non-motor and motor-related symptoms and their response to botulinum toxin therapy},
  author={M. Rudzinska and M. W{\'o}jcik and A. Szczudlik},
  journal={Journal of Neural Transmission},
  year={2010},
  volume={117},
  pages={765-772}
}
Hemifacial spasm (HFS) is a chronic movement disorder which presents as clonic and/or tonic facial muscle contractions frequently accompanied by many other sensory (visual or auditory disturbances, pain), motor (facial weakness, trismus, bruxism, dysarthria) and/or autonomic (lacrimation, salivation) symptoms. The aim of the study was to assess the occurrence of HFS non-motor and motor-related symptoms and their responsiveness to botulinum toxin type A (BTX-A) therapy. 56 HFS patients were… Expand
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