Help-Giving in Behavioral Control and Stress Coping Self-Help Groups

@article{Wollert1982HelpGivingIB,
  title={Help-Giving in Behavioral Control and Stress Coping Self-Help Groups},
  author={Richard W. Wollert and Leon H. Levy and Bob G Knight},
  journal={Small Group Research},
  year={1982},
  volume={13},
  pages={204 - 218}
}
Numerous summaries have been published regarding the psychosocial helping processes occurring in self-help groups (Antze, 1976; Back and Taylor, 1976; Barish, 1971; Bumbalo and Young, 1973; Caplan, 1974; Dean, 1970; Dumont, 1974; Evans, 1979; Gartner and Riessman, 1977; Hurvitz, 1974; Katz, 1970; Katz and Bender, 1976; Killilea, 1976; Levy, 1976). These reports have been invaluable in providing a framework for the understanding of self-help groups. Levels of agreement differ, however, as to… 

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