Hedgehogs use toad venom in their own defence

@article{Brodie1977HedgehogsUT,
  title={Hedgehogs use toad venom in their own defence},
  author={Edmund D. Brodie},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1977},
  volume={268},
  pages={627-628}
}
I REPORT here that toxic secretions evolved in prey organisms such as toads (Bufo) as chemical anti-predator mechanisms are used by hedgehogs (Insectivora, Erinaceidae) to enhance their own mechanical anti-predator adaptations—the spines, modified hairs, of the back. The secretions are taken into the mouth and licked on to the spines. In spite of interest in chemical, mechanical and behavioural anti-predator adaptions of both invertebrates and vertebrates1 there have been no reports of the… Expand
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