Heavy water nystagmus and effects of alcohol

@article{Money1974HeavyWN,
  title={Heavy water nystagmus and effects of alcohol},
  author={Kenneth E. Money and W. S. Myles},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1974},
  volume={247},
  pages={404-405}
}
AFTER drinking a large dose of ethyl alcohol (1 or 2 g of alcohol kg−1 of body weight), a phenomenon called positional alcohol nystagmus (PAN) occurs1,2. Nystagmus is an involuntary oscillating movement of the eyeballs in which they repeatedly turn slowly in one direction and fast in the reverse direction. The nystagmus that starts 30 min or so after drinking alcohol (PAN I) is called positional because it occurs only when the head is held in certain positions relative to gravity. When the head… 
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TLDR
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The otolith function probably is not affected by moderate alcohol intoxication levels, and equilibrium deterioration due to alcohol ingestion in the erect position is caused by a central integrative deficit and not by an otolith effect.
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TLDR
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New insights into positional alcohol nystagmus using three‐dimensional eye‐movement analysis
TLDR
Evaluating PAN in 8 normal subjects by means of three‐dimensional eye‐movement analysis showed that in addition to the nystagmus induced by the buoyancy of all six cupulae, alcohol intoxication also causes a vertical velocity offset that is independent of the orientation of the subject in space.
Effect of alcohol measured by dynamic posturography.
TLDR
It is concluded that dynamic posturography can detect the effect of alcohol on static and dynamic equilibrium and test conditions with absent vision appear to be the most sensitive.
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