Heavy metals in traditional Indian remedies

@article{Ernst2001HeavyMI,
  title={Heavy metals in traditional Indian remedies},
  author={E. Ernst},
  journal={European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology},
  year={2001},
  volume={57},
  pages={891-896}
}
  • E. Ernst
  • Published 2001
  • Medicine
  • European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Abstract. The growing popularity of traditional Indian remedies necessitates a critical evaluation of risks associated with their use. This systematic review aims at summarising all available data relating to the heavy metal content in such remedies. Computerised literature searches were carried out to identify all articles with original data on this subject. Fifteen case reports and six case series were found. Their collective results suggest that heavy metals, particularly lead, have been a… Expand
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