Heavy metal concentrations in feathers of common loons (Gavia immer) in the Northeastern United States and age differences in mercury levels

@article{Burger1994HeavyMC,
  title={Heavy metal concentrations in feathers of common loons (Gavia immer) in the Northeastern United States and age differences in mercury levels},
  author={Joanna Burger and Mark A. Pokras and Rebecca M Chafel and Michael Gochfeld},
  journal={Environmental Monitoring and Assessment},
  year={1994},
  volume={30},
  pages={1-7}
}
Feathers serve as a useful, non-destructive approach for biomonitoring some aspects of environmental quality. Birds can eliminate over 90% of their body burden of mercury by sequestration in growing feathers, and they molt their feathers at least annually. Thus mercury concentrations should not vary in avian feathers as a function of age. We tested the null hypothesis that there are no age differences in the concentrations of mercury, lead, cadmium, selenium, copper, chromium and manganese in… Expand
Heavy metal and selenium levels in feathers of known-aged common terns (Sterna hirundo)
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Concentrations of five metals and selenium in the breast feathers of known-aged common terns (Sterna hirundo) were examined and excretion of metals into the feathers at each molt was an efficient protective mechanism, preventing continued accumulation in the body with increasing age. Expand
Geographic trend in mercury measured in common loon feathers and blood
The common loon (Gavia immer) is a high-trophic-level, long-lived, obligate piscivore at risk from elevated levels of Hg through biomagnification and bioaccumulation. From 1991 to 1996 feather (n =Expand
Mercury, Methylmercury, and Selenium Concentrations in Eggs of Common Loons (Gavia immer) from Canada
TLDR
A weak but significant positive correlation was observed between egg-Hg and -Se concentrations and this relationship was unexpected and was contrary to relationships established for organic and inorganic Hg vs. Se in adult loon liver and kidney tissue. Expand
Food chain differences affect heavy metals in bird eggs in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey.
  • J. Burger
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Environmental research
  • 2002
TLDR
The levels of seven metals in the eggs of five species of marine birds that nest in Barnegat Bay, New Jersey are examined to determine whether there are differences among species and whether such differences reflect food chain differences. Expand
Sex-Related Levels of Selenium, Heavy Metals, and Organochlorine Compounds in American White Pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhyncos)
Abstract. Liver tissue from male and female adult American white pelicans (Pelecanus erythrorhyncos) were individually analyzed for organochlorine compounds and trace elements. Levels of mostExpand
Age Differences in Metals in the Blood of Herring (Larus argentatus) and Franklin's (Larus pipixcan) Gulls
TLDR
Comparisons of blood levels in adult and young herring and Franklin's gulls collected during the same breeding season in colonies in the New York Bight and in northwestern Minnesota indicated that herring gulls had significantly higher levels of arsenic, cadmium, and manganese than adults; adults had significantlyHigher levels of mercury and selenium. Expand
Heavy metals in Franklin's gull tissues: Age and tissue differences
We examined the concentrations of lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, manganese, and selenium in feathers, liver, kidney, heart, brain, and breast muscle of Franklin's gulls (Larus pipixcan) nesting inExpand
Metal Levels in Shorebird Feathers and Blood During Migration Through Delaware Bay
TLDR
Blood contaminant analysis provides a direct measure of recent dietary exposure, whereas feathers reflect body burden at the time of feather molt, and relatively high As levels in Semipalmated Sandpiper feathers and some high levels of Pb need to be further explored. Expand
Levels of trace elements in green turtle eggs collected from Hong Kong: Evidence of risks due to selenium and nickel.
TLDR
It was found that concentrations of Ag, Se, Zn, Hg and Pb in the shell of the turtle eggs were significantly correlated with levels in the whole egg contents (yolk+albumen). Expand
Metal levels in feathers of 12 species of seabirds from midway atoll in the northern Pacific Ocean.
TLDR
Compared to the means for metals in other birds generally, Christmas shearwaters had higher levels of lead, white tern adults were variable for lead, and bonin petrel, wedge-tailed shearwater, tropicbirds, frigatebirds, red-footed boobies, and both albatrosses hadHigher levels of mercury. Expand
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