Heat or Insulation: Behavioral Titration of Mouse Preference for Warmth or Access to a Nest

@article{Gaskill2012HeatOI,
  title={Heat or Insulation: Behavioral Titration of Mouse Preference for Warmth or Access to a Nest},
  author={Brianna N. Gaskill and Christopher J. Gordon and Edmond A. Pajor and Jeffrey R. Lucas and Jerry K. Davis and Joseph P. Garner},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2012},
  volume={7}
}
In laboratories, mice are housed at 20–24°C, which is below their lower critical temperature (≈30°C). This increased thermal stress has the potential to alter scientific outcomes. Nesting material should allow for improved behavioral thermoregulation and thus alleviate this thermal stress. Nesting behavior should change with temperature and material, and the choice between nesting or thermotaxis (movement in response to temperature) should also depend on the balance of these factors, such that… Expand
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