Heart rates and gas exchange in the Amazonian Manatee (Trichechus inunguis) in relation to diving

@article{Gallivan2004HeartRA,
  title={Heart rates and gas exchange in the Amazonian Manatee (Trichechus inunguis) in relation to diving},
  author={Gordon J Gallivan and John W. Kanwisher and Robin C. Best},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology B},
  year={2004},
  volume={156},
  pages={415-423}
}
Summary1.Unrestrained Amazonian manatees (Trichechus inunguis) maintained a constant heart rate during diving and exhibited a slight tachycardia during breathing. ‘Forcing’ the manatees to dive caused a marked bradycardia. They exhibited a more pronounced tachycardia during breathing after ‘forced’ dives and hyperventilated during recovery dives.2.Manatees are capable of dives exceeding 10 min duration without having to resport to anaerobic metabolism, and even after 10 min dives recover within… Expand
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