Heart Rate Characteristics and Laboratory Tests in Neonatal Sepsis

@article{Griffin2005HeartRC,
  title={Heart Rate Characteristics and Laboratory Tests in Neonatal Sepsis},
  author={M. Pamela Griffin and Douglas E. Lake and J. Randall Moorman},
  journal={Pediatrics},
  year={2005},
  volume={115},
  pages={937 - 941}
}
Objective. The evaluation of an infant for suspected sepsis often includes obtaining blood for laboratory tests. The shortcomings of the current practice are that the infant has to appear clinically ill for the diagnosis to be entertained, and the conventional laboratory tests are invasive. We have found that the clinical diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is preceded by abnormal heart rate characteristics (HRC) of reduced variability and transient decelerations, and we have devised a predictive HRC… 

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