Heart Rate Characteristics and Clinical Signs in Neonatal Sepsis

@article{Griffin2007HeartRC,
  title={Heart Rate Characteristics and Clinical Signs in Neonatal Sepsis},
  author={M. Pamela Griffin and Douglas E. Lake and Thomas Michael O'Shea and J. Randall Moorman},
  journal={Pediatric Research},
  year={2007},
  volume={61},
  pages={222-227}
}
Key MethodTo test the hypothesis that heart rate characteristic (HRC) monitoring adds information to clinical signs of illness in diagnosing neonatal sepsis, we prospectively recorded clinical data and the HRC index in 76 episodes of proven sepsis and 80 episodes of clinical sepsis in 337 infants in the University of Virginia NICU more than 7 d old. We devised an illness severity score based on clinical findings and tests relevant to sepsis.

Figures and Tables from this paper

Heart Rate Characteristics Monitoring in the NICU: A New Tool for Clinical Care and Research
TLDR
A heart rate characteristics monitor was developed which continuously calculates an HRC index which is the fold-increase in risk that a baby will experience a clinical deterioration consistent with proven or clinical sepsis in the next 24 hours.
Predicting Neonatal Sepsis Using Features of Heart Rate Variability, Respiratory Characteristics, and ECG-Derived Estimates of Infant Motion
TLDR
For the 49 infants studied, features of HRV, respiration, and movement showed characteristic changes in the hours leading up to the clinical suspicion of sepsis, namely, an increased propensity toward pathological heart rate decelerations, increased respiratory instability, and a decrease in spontaneous infant activity.
Clinical and vital sign changes associated with late-onset sepsis in very low birth weight infants at 3 NICUs.
TLDR
In VLBW infants at 3-NICUs, baseline, clinical, and HR-SpO2 variables associated with LOS versus SRO are described as well as baseline variables and clinical signs prompting sepsis work-ups ultimately determined to be late-onset sepsi (LOS) and sepsIS ruled out (SRO).
Abnormal Heart Rate Characteristics Prior to Clinical Diagnosis of Necrotizing Enterocolitis
TLDR
Earlier diagnosis and treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants, before clinical deterioration, might improve outcomes and suggest that continuous HRC monitoring may facilitate earlier detection and treatment.
Are vital signs indicative for bacteremia in newborns?
  • H. Yapıcıoğlu, F. Özlü, Y. Sertdemir
  • Medicine
    The journal of maternal-fetal & neonatal medicine : the official journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
  • 2015
TLDR
Monitoring vital signs closely might be helpful in a newborn infant to define a BSI, and a respiratory and blood pressure predictive monitoring system such as heart rate variability index may be developed for newborn patients with sepsis.
Heart rate characteristics: physiomarkers for detection of late-onset neonatal sepsis.
Abnormal heart rate characteristics before clinical diagnosis of necrotizing enterocolitis
TLDR
Earlier diagnosis and treatment of necrotizing enterocolitis in preterm infants, before clinical deterioration, might improve outcomes and suggest that continuous HRC monitoring may facilitate earlier detection and treatment.
Predictive monitoring for early detection of sepsis in neonatal ICU patients
TLDR
Harnessing and analyzing the vast amounts of physiologic data constantly displayed in ICU patients will lead to improved algorithms for early detection, prognosis, and therapy of critical illnesses.
Cardiovascular oscillations at the bedside: early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis using heart rate characteristics monitoring.
TLDR
It is found that measurements of standard deviation, sample asymmetry and sample entropy are highly related to imminent clinical illness.
Predictive monitoring for sepsis and necrotizing enterocolitis to prevent shock.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 31 REFERENCES
Heart Rate Characteristics and Laboratory Tests in Neonatal Sepsis
TLDR
It is found that the clinical diagnosis of neonatal sepsis is preceded by abnormal heart rate characteristics (HRC) of reduced variability and transient decelerations, and a predictive HRC monitoring strategy based on multivariable logistic regression analysis that was developed at one tertiary care NICU and validated at another.
Abnormal Heart Rate Characteristics Preceding Neonatal Sepsis and Sepsis-Like Illness
TLDR
Continuous HRC monitoring is a generally valid and potentially useful noninvasive tool in the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and sepsi-like illness.
Toward the early diagnosis of neonatal sepsis and sepsis-like illness using novel heart rate analysis.
TLDR
Newborn infants who had abrupt clinical deterioration as a result of sepsis and sepsi-like illness had abnormal HRC and SNAP that worsened over 24 hours before the clinical suspicion of Sepsis, leading to earlier diagnosis and more effective therapy.
Abnormal Heart Rate Characteristics Are Associated with Neonatal Mortality
TLDR
The abnormal heart rate characteristics (HRC) of reduced variability and transient decelerations accompany neonatal illness such as late-onset sepsis and are associated with an increased risk of death, and a noninvasive continuous measure that uses information collected throughout the hospitalization and that requires no data entry is proposed.
Heart rate characteristics monitoring for neonatal sepsis
TLDR
The experience in developing continuous HR characteristics monitoring to aid in the early diagnosis of sepsis in premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit is reviewed.
Sample Asymmetry Analysis of Heart Rate Characteristics with Application to Neonatal Sepsis and Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome
TLDR
It is concluded that SAA is a useful new mathematical technique for detecting the abnormal heart rate characteristics that precede neonatal sepsis and SIRS.
Late-onset sepsis in very low birth weight neonates: the experience of the NICHD Neonatal Research Network.
TLDR
Infants who developed late-onset sepsis had a significantly prolonged hospital stay and were significantly more likely to die than those who were uninfected, especially if they were infected with Gram-negative organisms or fungi.
...
...