Hearing one's own voice during phoneme vocalization--transmission by air and bone conduction.

@article{Reinfeldt2010HearingOO,
  title={Hearing one's own voice during phoneme vocalization--transmission by air and bone conduction.},
  author={Sabine Reinfeldt and Per Ostli and Bo H{\aa}kansson and Stefan Stenfelt},
  journal={The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America},
  year={2010},
  volume={128 2},
  pages={
          751-62
        }
}
The relationship between the bone conduction (BC) part and the air conduction (AC) part of one's own voice has previously not been well determined. This relation is important for hearing impaired subjects as a hearing aid affects these two parts differently and thereby changes the perception of one's own voice. A large ear-muff that minimized the occlusion effect while still attenuating AC sound was designed. During vocalization and wearing the ear muff the ear-canal sound pressure could be… CONTINUE READING

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