Hearing in prairie dogs: Transition between surface and subterranean rodents

@article{Heffner1994HearingIP,
  title={Hearing in prairie dogs: Transition between surface and subterranean rodents},
  author={Rickye S. Heffner and Henry E Heffner and Christopher Contos and Dara Kearns},
  journal={Hearing Research},
  year={1994},
  volume={73},
  pages={185-189}
}
Hearing in coruros (Spalacopus cyanus): special audiogram features of a subterranean rodent
TLDR
Learning curves and behavioural audiograms of subterranean, socially living coruros were obtained using a positive reinforcement conditioning procedure and revealed best hearing at frequencies between 1.25 and 1.6 kHz, which corresponds with the common pattern established in subterranean rodents studied so far.
Audiograms of three subterranean rodent species (genus Fukomys) determined by auditory brainstem responses reveal extremely poor high-frequency cut-offs
TLDR
Auditory brainstem recordings and audiograms of three mole-rat species reveal a highly restricted hearing range, similar to that of other subterranean mammals.
Audiogram of the fox squirrel (Sciurus niger).
TLDR
The behavioral audiograms of 2 fox squirrels (Sciurus niger) were determined with a conditioned avoidance procedure, and their ability to hear frequencies below 150 Hz indicates that they have good low-frequency hearing, as do the 2 other members of the squirrel family for which audiograms are available.
Hearing and sound localization in Cottontail rabbits, Sylvilagus floridanus
TLDR
Cottontail rabbits represent the first wild species of the order of lagomorphs whose hearing abilities have been determined and their large sound-localization threshold is consistent with the observation that mammals with broad fields of best vision require less acuity to direct their eyes to the sources of sound.
Hearing in a megachiropteran fruit bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus).
TLDR
Methodological issues, specifically training an animal to listen for low-intensity signals and imposing a significant cost for failing to report signals (i.e., misses), are discussed as the basis for the discrepancy between results and earlier reports.
Hearing in a Megachiropteran Fruit Bat (Rousettus aegyptiacus)
TLDR
Methodological issues, specifically training an animal to listen for low-intensity signals and imposing a significant cost for failing to report signals (i.e., misses), are discussed as the basis for the discrepancy between results and earlier reports.
Functional Parameters of Prestin Are Not Correlated With the Best Hearing Frequency
TLDR
A comparative study showed that the amino acid sequences and tertiary structures of five prestins were quite similar, suggesting that there might be a common fundamental mechanism driving the function of prestins.
Primate hearing from a mammalian perspective.
  • R. Heffner
  • Biology, Physics
    The anatomical record. Part A, Discoveries in molecular, cellular, and evolutionary biology
  • 2004
TLDR
Multiple lines of evidence support the view that sound localization is the selective pressure on smaller primates and on other mammals with short interaural distances for hearing high frequencies.
...
1
2
3
4
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES
Hearing in two cricetid rodents: wood rat (Neotoma floridana) and grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster).
TLDR
The inability of the grasshopper mouse to hear low frequencies as well as other desert rodents such as kangaroo rats and gerbils demonstrates that not all rodents found in deserts have developed good low-frequency hearing.
Degenerate hearing and sound localization in naked mole rats (Heterocephalus glaber), with an overview of central auditory structures
TLDR
The fact that subterranean mammals have little use for vision in a lightless environment suggests that naked mole rats represent an extreme case in this relationship and may explain the fact that, unlike surface‐dwelling mammals, they have virtually lost the ability to localize brief sounds.
Hearing sensitivity of the mongolian gerbil, Meriones unguiculatis.
  • A. Ryan
  • Physics
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
  • 1976
TLDR
Mongolian gerbils were trained to respond to pure tones in a shock‐avoidance task and thresholds derived from psychometric functions were essentially identical to those obtained by the method of limits.
Hearing in Glires: Domestic rabbit, cotton rat, feral house mouse, and kangaroo rat
TLDR
The results of hearing tests conducted on these four species are presented to expand the available sample of complete mamnmlian audiograms and update the sample further by inclusion of the audiograms of other species which have recently become available, and to apply these results to the analysis of the selective pressures involved in the evolution of high-frequency and low-frequency hearing limits.
Sound localization in a predatory rodent, the northern grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster).
TLDR
Calculation of the binaural sound localization cues available to rodents suggest that the grasshopper mouse may make more efficient use of the available locus cues than other rodents, and appears to be more accurate than predicted for a nonpredatory rodent of its size.
Hearing in mammals: the least weasel
TLDR
The high- frequencies hearing ability of the least weasel lends additional support to the relationship between functional interaural distance and high-frequency hearing, whereas its sensitivity to low frequencies in the absence of obvious morphological specialization of the middle ear makes the leastWeasel unusual among small mammals.
Sound Communications of Black-tailed, White-tailed, and Gunnison's Prairie Dogs
The sounds of black-tailed, white-tailed, and Gunnison's prairie dogs were studied in Colorado and Wyoming from February 1964 to June 1966. Observations, photographs, and tape recordings were made in
...
1
2
3
...