Hearing Voices in a Non-Psychiatric Population

@article{Lawrence2010HearingVI,
  title={Hearing Voices in a Non-Psychiatric Population},
  author={Catherine Louise Lawrence and Jason Jones and Myra J. Cooper},
  journal={Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy},
  year={2010},
  volume={38},
  pages={363 - 373}
}
Background: Many people hear voices but do not access psychiatric services and their experiences are largely unknown, not least because of the difficulty in contacting such people. This study investigates the beliefs held about voices, distress experienced, and provides a topographical account of the experience of hearing voices in a sample of individuals who hear voices in a non-psychiatric population. Method: A quantitative questionnaire internet-based study with a within-subjects and between… 

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Shame, social deprivation, and the quality of the voice-hearing relationship.
TLDR
The results suggest that therapies that target shame may be helpful when working with negative voice-hearing beliefs and relationships, and that psychological therapies that focus on shame such as compassion-focused therapy and that conceptualize voices interpersonally such as cognitive analytic therapy should be considered.
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