Healthy Birth Practice #3: Bring a Loved One, Friend, or Doula for Continuous Support

@article{Green2014HealthyBP,
  title={Healthy Birth Practice \#3: Bring a Loved One, Friend, or Doula for Continuous Support},
  author={Jeanne Green and Barbara A. Hotelling},
  journal={The Journal of Perinatal Education},
  year={2014},
  volume={23},
  pages={194 - 197}
}
All women should be allowed and encouraged to bring a loved one, friend, or doula to their birth without financial or cultural barriers. Continuous labor support offers benefits to mothers and their babies with no known harm. This article is an updated evidence-based review of the “Lamaze International Care Practices that Promote Normal Birth, Care Practice #3: Continuous Labor Support,” published in The Journal of Perinatal Education, 16(3), 2007. 
Healthy Birth Practice #4: Avoid Interventions Unless They Are Medically Necessary
  • J. Lothian
  • Medicine
    The Journal of Perinatal Education
  • 2014
TLDR
This article is an updated evidence-based review of the “Lamaze International Care Practices That Promote Normal Birth, Care Practice #4: No Routine Interventions,” published in The Journal of Perinatal Education, 16(3), 2007.
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  • Medicine
    The Journal of Perinatal Education
  • 2019
TLDR
The use and effect of routine interventions on the physiologic process of labor and birth is described and the unintended consequences resulting from the routine use of these interventions in labor andBirth are identified.
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  • Medicine, Psychology
    The Journal of Perinatal Education
  • 2016
TLDR
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It is found that in labor, women feel better when cared for and encouraged by people they know and trust, and the scope and limitations of the care provided by medical care providers are studied.
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More research is needed to identify attitudes of members of the maternity care team toward doulas and to better understand implications of their attitudes on working together collaboratively and on patient outcomes.
Women’s experiences of emotionally and psychologically traumatic birth; hegemony and authoritarianism in Victorian public maternity settings
Background: Contemporary birthing practises in Australia pose a medicalised technological environment whereby women’s needs are often secondary to the hospital-medical environment. As a result of the
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Continuous labor support provided by female labor companions (doulas) in randomized controlled studies has previously been shown to decrease the incidence of Caesarean sections and perinatal
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