Health-related quality of life in the Royal Norwegian Navy: does officer rank matter?

Abstract

The health-related quality of life of Royal Norwegian Navy officers was compared with that of the general population and the association between health-related quality of life and the rank of the officers was estimated in a cross-sectional survey of 1,316 male officers, 25 to 62 years of age, in September 2002. Standardized scores for the SF-36 Health Survey were used for the comparison with the general population, and the mean raw scores for the eight SF-36 subscales were used for the association within the Navy study population. The health-related quality of life of the Navy officers was similar to that of the general population of Norway when adjusted for age, gender, having a job, and educational level. Higher military rank among male Navy officers was associated with better health-related quality of life when adjusted for age but not when adjusted for other sociodemographic variables and lifestyle factors. Physical activity seemed to be the most important positive lifestyle factor.

Cite this paper

@article{Magery2007HealthrelatedQO, title={Health-related quality of life in the Royal Norwegian Navy: does officer rank matter?}, author={Nils Mager\oy and Trond Riise and Bj\orn Helge Johnsen and Bente Elisabeth Moen}, journal={Military medicine}, year={2007}, volume={172 8}, pages={835-42} }