Health effects of vegetarian and vegan diets

@article{Key2006HealthEO,
  title={Health effects of vegetarian and vegan diets},
  author={Timothy J. Key and Paul N. Appleby and Magdalena Rosell},
  journal={Proceedings of the Nutrition Society},
  year={2006},
  volume={65},
  pages={35 - 41}
}
Vegetarian diets do not contain meat, poultry or fish; vegan diets further exclude dairy products and eggs. Vegetarian and vegan diets can vary widely, but the empirical evidence largely relates to the nutritional content and health effects of the average diet of well-educated vegetarians living in Western countries, together with some information on vegetarians in non-Western countries. In general, vegetarian diets provide relatively large amounts of cereals, pulses, nuts, fruits and… Expand
Health effects of vegan diets.
  • W. Craig
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 2009
TLDR
A vegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content of fiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E, potassium, magnesium, and many phytochemicals and a fat content that is more unsaturated. Expand
Nutrition concerns and health effects of vegetarian diets.
  • W. Craig
  • Medicine
  • Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
  • 2010
TLDR
A vegetarian diet usually provides a low intake of saturated fat and cholesterol and a high intake of dietary fiber and many health-promoting phytochemicals, and typically has lower body mass index, serum total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and blood pressure. Expand
Health effects of vegan diets 1-3
Recently, vegetarian diets have experienced an increase in popularity. Avegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content offiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E,Expand
The long-term health of vegetarians and vegans
TLDR
The long-term health of vegetarians appears to be generally good, and for some diseases and medical conditions it may be better than that of comparable omnivores. Expand
Vegetarian Diet: Why Is It Beneficial?
A vegetarian diet is a type of diet that excludes meats, or seafoods, or sometimes even eggs and dairy. People choose to have a plant-based diet like that are called vegetarians, and some of them doExpand
Vegetarian Diet and Effects of Vegetarian Nutrition on Health
A vegetarian is a person who either does not or limitedly consume meat or animal-derived foods. Vegetarian diets can be classified as lacto vegetarian, ovo vegetarian, lacto-ovo vegetarian, veganExpand
Vegetarian diets, low-meat diets and health: a review
TLDR
Evidence linking red meat intake, particularly processed meat, and increased risk of CHD, cancer and type 2 diabetes is convincing and provides indirect support for consumption of a plant-based diet. Expand
POSSIBLE HEALTH RISKS IN SUBJECTS WITH DOMINANT PLANT FOOD CONSUMPTION
TLDR
The findings suggest that limited consumption of animal food and dominant consumption of plant food can be connected with possible health risks (higher incidence of deficient values of vitamin B12, vitamin D, iron and long-chain n-3 fatty acids). Expand
Health Implications of a Vegetarian Diet
TLDR
The evidence for the health benefits of a vegetarian diet is reviewed and strategies for meeting the nutritional needs of those following a vegetarian or plant-based eating pattern are discussed. Expand
Iodine Deficiency in Vegetarian and Vegan Diets: Evidence-Based Review of the World’s Literature on Iodine Content in Vegetarian Diets
TLDR
This chapter responds to concerns by first considering the prevalence, demography and lifestyle characteristics of vegetarians residing mainly in developed countries, and finally, by reviewing the nutrition and epidemiological studies that assessed iodine nutrition in vegetarians. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 78 REFERENCES
Position of the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada: vegetarian diets.
  • A. R. Mangels, V. Messina, V. Melina
  • Medicine
  • Canadian journal of dietetic practice and research : a publication of Dietitians of Canada = Revue canadienne de la pratique et de la recherche en dietetique : une publication des Dietetistes du Canada
  • 2003
TLDR
This position paper reviews the current scientific data related to key nutrients for vegetarians including protein, iron, zinc, calcium, vitamin D, riboflavin, vitamin B-12, vitamin A, n-3 fatty acids, and iodine and suggests that a vegetarian, including vegan, diet can meet current recommendations for all of these nutrients. Expand
Physical fitness and vegetarian diets: is there a relation?
  • D. Nieman
  • Medicine
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 1999
TLDR
In conclusion, a vegetarian diet per se is not associated with improved aerobic endurance performance and a varied and well-planned vegetarian diet is compatible with successful athletic endeavor. Expand
Achieving optimal essential fatty acid status in vegetarians: current knowledge and practical implications.
TLDR
Total n-3 requirements may be higher for vegetarians than for nonvegetarians, as vegetarians must rely on conversion of ALA to EPA and DHA, although the response is generally less for ALA than for EPA andDHA. Expand
Long-term ovo-lacto vegetarian diet impairs vitamin B-12 status in pregnant women.
TLDR
Serum vitamin B-12 concentrations increased and plasma tHcy decreased sharply with increasing dietary intake of vitamin B -12 toward a cutoff point of 3 mug/d, and current recommended dietary intakes urgently need reevaluation. Expand
Nutritional considerations for vegetarian athletes.
TLDR
This review examines whether nutrients that may differ between vegetarian and omnivorous diets could affect physical performance and describes recent studies that attempt to assess the effects of a vegetarian diet on performance. Expand
Do vegetarians have a normal bone mass?
  • S. New
  • Medicine
  • Osteoporosis International
  • 2004
TLDR
From data available and given the limitations stipulated above, “vegetarians” do certainly appear to have “normal” bone mass, and the challenge is to determine what components of a vegetarian diet are of particular benefit to bone, at what levels and under which mechanisms. Expand
Vegetarian diet and blood pressure levels: incidental or causal association?
Evidence that nutrients other than the major cations may influence blood pressure levels stems from studies of acculturated vegetarians and from randomized controlled dietary trials. Earlier studiesExpand
Health benefits of a vegetarian diet.
TLDR
The evidence available suggests that widespread adoption of a vegetarian diet could prevent approximately 40,000 deaths from IHD in Britain each year. Expand
Essential fatty acid requirements of vegetarians in pregnancy, lactation, and infancy.
  • T. Sanders
  • Biology, Medicine
  • The American journal of clinical nutrition
  • 1999
TLDR
On the basis of experiments in primates that showed altered visual function with a high ratio of linoleic acid to alpha-linolenic acid, it would be prudent to recommend diets with a ratio between 4:1 and 10:1 in vegetarians and that excessive intakes of linolesic acid be avoided. Expand
The effect of diet on plasma homocysteine concentrations in healthy male subjects
TLDR
Dietary methionine intake has no observable effect on plasma homocysteine concentration in habitual diets, where folate intake is adequate, lowered vitamin B12 intake from animal foods leads to depleted plasma vitamin B 12 concentration with a concomitant increase in homocy steine concentration. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...