Health and immunology study following exposure to toxigenic fungi (Stachybotrys chartarum) in a water-damaged office environment.

@article{Johanning1996HealthAI,
  title={Health and immunology study following exposure to toxigenic fungi (Stachybotrys chartarum) in a water-damaged office environment.},
  author={Eckardt Johanning and R. Biagini and D Hull and Philip R. Morey and Bruce B. Jarvis and Paul A. Landsbergis},
  journal={International archives of occupational and environmental health},
  year={1996},
  volume={68 4},
  pages={
          207-18
        }
}
There is growing concern about adverse health effects of fungal bio-aerosols on occupants of water-damaged buildings. Accidental, occupational exposure in a nonagricultural setting has not been investigated using modern immunological laboratory tests. The objective of this study was to evaluate the health status of office workers after exposure to fungal bio-aerosols, especially Stachybotrys chartarum (atra) (S. chartarum) and its toxigenic metabolites (satratoxins), and to study laboratory… 

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