Health Effects of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria: “The CyanoHABs”

@article{Carmichael2001HealthEO,
  title={Health Effects of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria: “The CyanoHABs”},
  author={Wayne W. Carmichael},
  journal={Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal},
  year={2001},
  volume={7},
  pages={1393 - 1407}
}
  • W. Carmichael
  • Published 1 September 2001
  • Biology
  • Human and Ecological Risk Assessment: An International Journal
Increasingly, harmful algal blooms (HABs) are being reported worldwide due to several factors, primarily eutrophication, climate change and more scientific monitoring. All but cyanobacteria toxin poisonings (CTPs) are mainly a marine occurrence. CTPs occur in fresh (lakes, ponds, rivers and reservoirs) and brackish (seas, estuaries, and lakes) waters throughout the world. Organisms responsible include an estimated 40 genera but the main ones are Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis… Expand
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