Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: Tensions and Controversies in the Field

@article{Hughes2008Health2A,
  title={Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: Tensions and Controversies in the Field},
  author={Benjamin Hughes and Indra Joshi and Jonathan Wareham},
  journal={Journal of Medical Internet Research},
  year={2008},
  volume={10}
}
Background The term Web 2.0 became popular following the O’Reilly Media Web 2.0 conference in 2004; however, there are difficulties in its application to health and medicine. Principally, the definition published by O’Reilly is criticized for being too amorphous, where other authors claim that Web 2.0 does not really exist. Despite this skepticism, the online community using Web 2.0 tools for health continues to grow, and the term Medicine 2.0 has entered popular nomenclature. Objective This… 

Tables from this paper

Definition of Health 2.0 and Medicine 2.0: A Systematic Review

A systematic literature review of electronic databases and gray literature on the Internet using the search engines Google, Bing, and Yahoo was performed to find unique definitions of Health 2.0/Medicine 1.0 and recurrent topics within the definitions.

Web 2.0 Applications in Medicine: Trends and Topics in the Literature

This bibliometric analysis shows that the biomedical community is engaged in the use of Web 2.0 applications and confirms its high level of interest in these tools, indicating the successful integration of Web2.0 into the biomedical field.

Web 2.0 in Healthcare: The Rise of a Fashion Wave? Examining the Discourse in the Literature

It is shown that there is almost no academic discourse on Web 2.0 in healthcare in the IS research literature, and there is an ongoing discourse on the subject with a wave-like shape in the domainspecific and practitioner-oriented literature.

The Emergent Discipline of Health Web Science

This paper introduces Health Web Science as a subdiscipline of Web Science, distinct from but overlapping with Medicine 2.0, in relation to health maintenance, health care, and health policy.

Reflections on pathology and "Web 2.0".

  • M. Wick
  • Education
    American journal of clinical pathology
  • 2009
In this issue of the Journal , Schreiber and Giustini1 provide a concise overview of the ways in which “Web 2.0” has affected—and will influence—the teaching and practice of pathology. As they

Research Model to Identify the Characteristics of an Effective Medicine 2.0 Application

If a Med 2.0 application improves patient outcomes the improvement is “caused” or at least explained by the Med 1.0 approach, the research will focus on investigating the empirical effect of using Med2.0 Applications on Patient Outcomes.

Health 2.0 in practice : A review of German health care web portals

This paper presents an extensive analysis of up-to-date German web portals that provide health-related content from a user perspective and tries to clarify the term health 2.0.

Medicine 2.0: Social Networking, Collaboration, Participation, Apomediation, and Openness

  • G. Eysenbach
  • Medicine, Computer Science
    Journal of medical Internet research
  • 2008
In a very significant development for eHealth, a broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally

Delivering quality-evaluated healthcare information in the era of Web 2.0: design implications for Intute: Health and Life Sciences

Intute: Health and Life Sciences is one such service, and its design in the context of meeting current Web 2.0 expectations and addressing concerns about quality is the focus of the article.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 107 REFERENCES

Introducing Web 2.0: weblogs and podcasting for health librarians

This installment of this series of articles is discussing weblogging and podcasting, a social phenomenon of users’ experience of the Web and is characterized by open communication, decentralization of authority, and freedom to share and re-use Web content.

Introducing Web 2.0: social networking and social bookmarking for health librarians

This article will follow the theme of the excellent Canadian Health Libraries Association / Association des bibliotheques de la sante du Canada 2006 Conference in Vancouver and share with you some pearls the authors have come to know about social networks and social bookmarking and folksonomies.

Medicine 2.0: Social Networking, Collaboration, Participation, Apomediation, and Openness

  • G. Eysenbach
  • Medicine, Computer Science
    Journal of medical Internet research
  • 2008
In a very significant development for eHealth, a broad adoption of Web 2.0 technologies and approaches coincides with the more recent emergence of Personal Health Application Platforms and Personally

What medical educators need to know about “Web 2.0”

The unique features of Web 2.0 technologies are reviewed, questions regarding potential pitfalls are addressed and valuable applications in health science education are suggested.

What Is eHealth (4): A Scoping Exercise to Map the Field

To map the emergence and scope of eHealth as a topic and to identify its place within the wider health informatics field, as part of a larger review of research and expert analysis pertaining to current evidence, best practice and future trends is commissioned.

Introducing Web 2.0: RSS trends for health librarians

Knowing very little about Web 2.0 or its implications for my work as a health sciences information professional, I chose to read Tim O’Reilly’s article “What Is Web 1.0?”.

The internet as a health education tool: sieving the wheat from the chaff.

  • S. Goh
  • Medicine
    Singapore medical journal
  • 2006
The internet has empowered the human race in the pursuit of knowledge like no other media has before, with the possible exception of the printing press. Some may argue that print and broadcast media

Introducing Web 2.0: wikis for health librarians

An introduction to wikis for health librarians argues that wikis were not necessarily meant to replace trusted print and digital information, and that when used responsibly as part of an overall content management plan, wikis can enhance traditional collections and services.

Medical Librarian 2.0

  • E. Connor
  • Computer Science
    Medical reference services quarterly
  • 2007
Medical librarians can connect with present and future generations of users by learning more about the social dynamics of Web 2.0's vast ecosystem, and incorporating some of its interactive tools and technologies into routine library practice.

Web 2.0 technologies for undergraduate and postgraduate medical education: an online survey

There is an overall high awareness of a range of new Web 2.0 technologies by both medical students and qualified medical practitioners and high interest in its use for medical education, but there is increased training in how to use this new approach.
...