Healing, Reconciliation, Forgiving and the Prevention of Violence after Genocide or Mass Killing: An Intervention and Its Experimental Evaluation in Rwanda

@article{Staub2005HealingRF,
  title={Healing, Reconciliation, Forgiving and the Prevention of Violence after Genocide or Mass Killing: An Intervention and Its Experimental Evaluation in Rwanda},
  author={Ervin Staub and Laurie Anne Pearlman and Alexandra Gubin and Athanase Hagengimana},
  journal={Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology},
  year={2005},
  volume={24},
  pages={297-334}
}
This article describes a theory–based intervention in Rwanda to promote healing and reconciliation, and an experimental evaluation of its effects. The concept of reconciliation and conditions required for reconciliation after genocide or other intense intergroup violence are discussed, with a focus on healing. A training of facilitators who worked for local organizations that worked with groups of people in the community is described. The training consisted of psycho–educational lectures with… Expand

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