Headship succession and household division in three Chinese banner serf populations, 1789–1909

@article{Lee1998HeadshipSA,
  title={Headship succession and household division in three Chinese banner serf populations, 1789–1909},
  author={James Z. Lee and Cameron Dougall Campbell},
  journal={Continuity and Change},
  year={1998},
  volume={13},
  pages={117 - 141}
}
In late imperial China, as many as 10 per cent of all peasants were unfree. The most common form of unfree labour was state populations organized under the Eight Banners, an elite military organization. This article discusses household succession and household division in three such banner populations organized under the imperial household agency (neiwufu). The banner household, called hu in Han Chinese or boigon in Manchu Chinese, was defined by common residence and common consumption… 

Changes in household formation and composition in China since the mid-twentieth century

China has experienced great changes in household formation and composition since the mid-twentieth century, and its mean size of households has fallen from 54 persons in 1947 to 3.1 in 2005. Many of

State of the field: the family and marriage in China

How the family can be best defined is a subject of debate among scholars. While we acknowledge the different definitions of the family, we consider the family as a basic unit of human society to

Cross-Status Marriage Patterns in Late 17th Century Korea: Statistical Analysis of the Tansŏng Household Registers for 1678

This paper presents preliminary results of statistical analysis of the Tansŏng County household registers for 1678. We focus on identifying the social class of county residents and on identifying

Coresidential Patterns in Historical China: A Simulation Study

The controversy regarding China's historical residential patterns is related to the lack of investigation into demographic influences on past kinship structures and household formation. This study

Demographic Responses to Economic and Environmental Crises

In this paper mortality crises in a rural area in southern Sweden are analysed by using a new approach. We start off with a combined life-event and time-series analysis approach in which the

Demographic Impacts of Climatic Fluctuations in Northeast China

We examine the demographic impacts of climatic fluctuations in northeast China in the late eighteenth century and the nineteenth century. Specifically, we focus on the consequences of extended

Historical Chinese Microdata. 40 Years of Dataset Construction by the Lee-Campbell Research Group

The Lee-Campbell Group has spent forty years constructing and analysing individual-level datasets based largely on Chinese archival materials to produce a scholarship of discovery. Initially, we

Villages, Descent Groups, Households, and Individual Outcomes in Rural Liaoning, 1789–1909

We make use of a uniquely detailed and voluminous longitudinal, individual and household-level dataset from rural Liaoning in northeast China during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries to compare

Cross-Class Nuptiality Patterns in Traditional Korea: Statistical Analysis of the Tansong Household Registers for 1678

This paper presents preliminary results of statistical analysis of the Tansong County household registers for 1678. We focus on identifying the social class of county residents and on identifying

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 17 REFERENCES

Patching the Holes in Chinese Genealogies: Mortality in the Lineage Populations of Tongcheng County, 1300-1880

Since the initial work using lineage genealogies for Chinese demographic history began, researchers have become accustomed to using very fragmentary data from which to reconstruct historical

On the Holes in Chinese Genealogies

The Problem The social history of Europe from the sixteenth to the twentieth centuries has been greatly enriched by the incorporation of the detailed demographic history of small communities. As

Comparing Household Structure Over Time and Between Cultures

Because of the importance of the family and household in all societies and at all historical periods, it is essential to be able to make comparisons between varieties of domestic groups. If we wish

The Chinese distinguish twelve-year cycles in which each year is identified with a specific animal : rat, ox, tiger, rabbit, dragon, snake, horse, sheep, monkey, chicken, dog, and pig

    All banner populations were tied to a specific place of residence. Individuals who departed from the area without permission were identified in the registers as ' escapees ' (taoding)

      These categories are not head-neutral. Given the importance of the household head, Chinese sources are always careful to identify who he or she was

        Wives are always listed immediately after their husbands

          Baqi zhidu huji chutan

            Most of the so-called extended households in fact were extended vertically

              We would like to thank Melvin Thatcher and Jeff Svare of the Genealogical Society of Utah for their generous assistance here and elsewhere in obtaining such source material