Head lice infestations: A clinical update.

@article{Cummings2018HeadLI,
  title={Head lice infestations: A clinical update.},
  author={C. Cummings and J. Finlay and N. MacDonald},
  journal={Paediatrics \& child health},
  year={2018},
  volume={23 1},
  pages={
          e18-e24
        }
}
Head lice (Pediculus humanus capitis) infestations are not a primary health hazard or a vector for disease, but they are a societal problem with substantial costs. Diagnosis of head lice infestation requires the detection of a living louse. Although pyrethrins and permethrin remain first-line treatments in Canada, isopropyl myristate/ST-cyclomethicone solution and dimeticone can be considered as second-line therapies when there is evidence of treatment failure. 
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